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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    apostrophe

    If I am typing the following where should the apostrophe be

    A play about a grandmothers experience of......

  2. Unregistered
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    #2

    apostrophe

    Hello Can you help please?
    If I am typing the following where should the apostrophe be

    A play about a grandmothers experience of......

    should the apostrophe come before the s in grandmothers it is only one grandmother and the experience belongs to her - or am I completely up the spout?

  3. Hi_there_Carl's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: apostrophe

    The apostrophe has three uses:
    1) to form possessives of nouns
    2) to show the omission of letters
    3) to indicate certain plurals of lowercase letters.
    Apostrophes are NOT used for possessive pronouns or for noun plurals, including acronyms.



    Your case deals with the first (possessives of nouns:

    Forming possessives of nouns

    To see if you need to make a possessive, turn the phrase around and make it an "of the..." phrase. For example:
    the boy's hat = the hat of the boy three days' journey = journey of three days
    If the noun after "of" is a building, an object, or a piece of furniture, then no apostrophe is needed!
    room of the hotel = hotel room
    door of the car = car door
    leg of the table = table leg
    Once you've determined whether you need to make a possessive, follow these rules to create one.
    add 's to the singular form of the word (even if it ends in -s):
    the owner's car James's hat
    add 's to the plural forms that do not end in -s:
    the children's game the geese's honking
    add ' to the end of plural nouns that end in -s:
    houses' roofs three friends' letters
    add 's to the end of compound words:
    my brother-in-law's money
    add 's to the last noun to show joint possession of an object:
    Todd and Anne's apartment

    so in your case it should be Grandmother's experience

  4. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #4

    Cool Re: apostrophe

    I've always thought that if the word ends in "s" this "s" is not written in forming possessives of nouns. For instance, you write "James's hat", and I would have written "James' hat." So could you explain to me this rule, please?

  5. Hi_there_Carl's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: apostrophe

    According to the rule;

    James' hat would indicate more than one James

    I know it looks awkward..... but....

    James's hat is actually correct to describe the hat belonging to a single person named James.

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    #6

    Re: apostrophe

    The rule is really simple; spell it like you say it.

    If the hat belongs to James it is James's hat because I would say, "Jaymziz hat."

    If the cars belong to those boys, they are those boys' cars because I would say, "boyz carz."

  6. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #7

    Cool Re: apostrophe

    I think I understand. So, if we are talking about something belonging to a concret person (We say his name), then the "s" after the apostrophe is required, but if we are talking about something belonging to a common noun (like boys, in plural), the "s" after the apostrophe is not required.
    Am I right? Let me ask one more question on that. If we are talking about something belonging to a singular person or thing, a common noun, but it ends with "s", then, should we miss the "s" after the apostrophe?



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    #8

    Re: apostrophe

    No - you need the apostrophe to indicate possession - the boys' car; the grandmothers' experiences; the cows' calves.

    Again no. If you have a word ending in an s requiring a possessive, you need 's. The bus's engine; James's hat; Mr Jones's car; the bass's voice
    Last edited by Anglika; 03-Feb-2008 at 00:33.


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    #9

    Re: apostrophe

    It's great to have you there. It seems to me that here in Spain teachers teach the rule badly because I had exactly the same idea as Bushwhacker. I thought it was Elvis' guitar (pronounced elvisiz) instead of Elvis's. So thanks because now I've got it right. Can't wait to see my teacher's face.

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