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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    146

    Red face William

    I have written the explanation of "The daffodils" by William Wordsworth. Could anyone please correct and write to if the explanation is grammatically and poetically correct? Please.


    Explanation of “The daffodils” by William Wordsworth

    When the poet was wandering lonely in Lake District, he comes upon a bunch of daffodils which elates him. He says that he saw them in abundance beside a lake and beneath the trees. He is really excited to see them fluttering and dancing as they are swayed by the breeze that blows across the lake. He says that the waves danced like the flowers but not with glee. The innumerable flowers tossing their heads in sprightly dance resemble the bright stars in the Galaxy. Shining, twinkling and dancing, the flowers instill joy and life that lift the lonely heart of Wordsworth into a state of bliss. In such a company, the poet is gay. He is not only experiencing immediate pleasure but is storing the experience for the future. Later, when he is in a pensive mood or lonely, he is able to recall these delightful pictures of the daffodils. They flash upon his inward eye and give him peace.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,397

    Re: William

    Quote Originally Posted by samfat33 View Post
    I have written the explanation of "The daffodils" by William Wordsworth. Could anyone please correct and write to if the explanation is grammatically and poetically correct? Please.


    Explanation of “The daffodils” by William Wordsworth

    When the poet was wandering lonely[rather than repeat the poem, use "alone/on his own", or omit the reference altogether] in the Lake District, he comes upon a bunch [This sounds like a bunch of flowers you would hold in your hand. I would omit this altogether, or say "a sheet" or "a mass"] of daffodils which elates him. He says that he saw them in abundance beside a lake and beneath the trees. He is really excited to see them fluttering and dancing as they are swayed by the breeze that blows across the lake. He says that the waves danced like the flowers but not with glee. The innumerable flowers tossing their heads in sprightly dance resemble [that resembled/resembling] the bright stars in the Galaxy. Shining, twinkling and dancing, the flowers instill joy and life that lift the lonely heart of Wordsworth into a state of bliss. In such a company, the poet is gay. He is not only experiencing immediate pleasure but is storing the experience for the future. Later, when he is in a pensive mood or lonely, he is able to recall these delightful pictures of the daffodils. They flash upon his inward eye and give him peace.
    .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    146

    Re: William

    Thanks a lot Anglika.

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