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    • Join Date: Jan 2008
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    #1

    cheesy and mushy

    Hi, again.
    What do these two adjectives mean?. I came across them in an article about a music band and I got the impression that they were synonyms but my dictionary says they are not. (Cheesy- poor quality, mushy-in a bad taste). Can anybody give me an example to illustrate real use and meaning. Thanks a lot.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    Basically, cheesy means like cheese in taste, smell, or consistency. It has an Informal usage = cheap or blatantly artificial.


    Mushy means in the form of mush - for instance, mushy peas are boiled peas that are then broken into a mush. It has an Informal usage = cloyingly sentimental.

    So presumably the band concerned is playing sentimental and emotionally artificial music.


    • Join Date: Jan 2008
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    #3

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    Great, thanks. I wouldn't like to hurt anyone's feelings, but actually it was a four-letter band -capitals- quite popular in the '70s, but don't worry, they were neither English nor American. Bye Anglika, thanks again.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    In AmE, "cheesy" refers to something of poor quality, or is a poor imitation, or something hopelessly dated and behind the times.

    "Have you ever heard Pat Boone's cheesy version of Little Richard's 'Tutti Frutti'? Awful."

    "Mushy" refers to anything that is overly romantic, sentimental or involves public displays of affection. Sometimes "mushy" is a matter of perspective; lots of women like movies like Love Story, while a lot of men cringe and find it too mushy.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    Quote Originally Posted by Wuisi View Post
    Great, thanks. I wouldn't like to hurt anyone's feelings, but actually it was a four-letter band -capitals- quite popular in the '70s, but don't worry, they were neither English nor American. Bye Anglika, thanks again.

    ABBA is neither cheesy nor mushy! Well, except for some of their songs....


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #6

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    I remember having an argument with someone when ABBA was at its most popular because in their view the band was both cheesy and mushy!


    • Join Date: Jan 2008
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    #7

    Re: cheesy and mushy

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    In AmE, "cheesy" refers to something of poor quality, or is a poor imitation, or something hopelessly dated and behind the times.

    "Have you ever heard Pat Boone's cheesy version of Little Richard's 'Tutti Frutti'? Awful."

    "Mushy" refers to anything that is overly romantic, sentimental or involves public displays of affection. Sometimes "mushy" is a matter of perspective; lots of women like movies like Love Story, while a lot of men cringe and find it too mushy.

    Hi Ouisch and Anglika. Overwhelmed by the examples. I happen to have listened to the version and seen the movie. I think I won't forget it. By the way, it wasn't me that said ABBA, ...how on earth did you guess?. Thanks again.
    Last edited by Wuisi; 07-Feb-2008 at 02:10.

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