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    #1

    on the move/in motion/on the go

    Dear teachers,

    There are a few expression in English language which are very identical, namely “on the move”, “in motion” and “on the go”.

    A nurse is on the move all day long.

    Our troops are on the move again.

    Our planes reported that large enemy forces were on the move.

    If a thing is in motion, it is not in rest.

    A press conference set the new project in motion.

    Let’s set the wheels in motion for the new library wing.

    I’m exhausted – I’ve been on the go since eight this morning.

    She is on the go all day.

    I know that the expression above in bold imply “busily moving around, very active, in constant activity, very busy, get going, give impetus.

    Could you tell me something else about the expressions in question. There is a real danger making a muddle.

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #2

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    'In motion' and 'on the move' do not convey the impression of being busy to me. 'On the go' is the one that conveys the sense of rush. I probably wouldn't use 'on the move' with the first example of a nurse- I'd use 'on the go'.
    'In motion' often denotes the first step- all your examples do, while on the move `could come after a number of pauses, as in the troops being on the move again.

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    #3

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    Hi Tdol,

    Thank you for your detail explanation. In my natural language the meanings of the all expressions in question are identical to a great extent. The following examples are from Answer.com.

    on the move = busily moving about, very active, as in A nurse is on the move all day long. [Mid-1800s] Also see on the go.

    on the move = going from one place to another
    Synonym: active

    on the go = In constant activity, very busy, as in I'm exhausted--I've been on the go since eight this morning.

    in motion = in motion is a health promotion program aimed to have people become more physically active on a regular basis

    The ball now was in motion. = The ball was in play.

    This one prompted me to open the present theme.
    Thank you again for your generous sharing the peculiarities of English language with me. I know it is difficult to come to the niceties of the language. But it is worth trying and finding some way of achieving this good condition.

    Thank you for your kind thought of me.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 13-Feb-2008 at 12:50.

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    #4

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    Hmm; if an army is on the move, it doesn't necessarily move that it is going particularly quickly IMO. The nurse example is very old.

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    #5

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    Dear Tdol,

    I hope I have not bored you. I would have believe that you have made the sense of my standpoint. The all three expressions in question are very identical to a great extent ( I don't say "100% identity") but really to a certain extent (within definite limits). This is yet a premise for eventual presence of mistakes and errors.
    I give you my word for it, there is really a exceptional embarrassment for the NNES the properly and wide- spread use of the expression in question.
    on the move = busily moving about, very active, as in A nurse is on the move all day long.
    on the move = going from one place to another, traveling, as in Our troops are on the move again.

    on the move = making progress, advancing, as in Their technology is clearly on the move

    The adjective has one meaning: being in physical motion
    Synonym: active


    on the go = In constant activity, very busy, as in I'm exhausted--I've been on the go since eight this morning.


    The adjective has one meaning: (of a person) very busy and active

    Regards.

    V.

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    #6

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    The adjective has one meaning: (of a person) very busy and active- Yes, but as a description of the activity and business now, not as a general characteristic, which is often what 'active means.

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    #7

    Re: on the move/in motion/on the go

    The ball now was in motion. = The ball was in play.
    'now was' is in direct conflict.
    The ball was in motion, or, the ball is now in motion.
    Both of those could be used in a variety of ball games, although your 'in play' is perfectly correct, especially for team games such as football.
    As Tdol has pointed out 'on the move' only indicates some movement, which may be slow, very slow, moving off (and may pick up speed) or a pace a bit quicker than slow. When we wish to indicate something quicker we might use: the traffic is on the move now and picking up speed; the cyclists are remounting after that accident and on the move again with the leaders starting to increase the pace.

    In motion is more relevant to a continuous activity, such as a laboratory experiment where a wheel, say, is either at rest or spinning round. I would not use 'in motion' to do with any health exercise. Set the wheels in motion, is fine, but not 'A press conference set the new project in motion.', better would be 'set the new project off' or 'started the new project'. Motion is not the same as movement. Motion indicates that something is being moved whereas movement (in this context), the act or manner of moving.

    These are all fine differences; they do cause difficulties when finding exact translations in some languages.

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