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    #1

    Question by no means

    "As Smith and Windmill (1999) claim, this procedure can be used for any problem mentioned above, and by no means would I disagree with them."

    Does the above sentence read well?

    Thanks,
    Nyggus

  1. oregeezer's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: by no means

    By all means.

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    #3

    Re: by no means

    Quote Originally Posted by oregeezer View Post
    By all means.
    "By all means" would change the meaning IMO. I want to say that I do agree with them. So?

    Nyggus

  2. RedMtl's Avatar
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    #4

    Smile Re: by no means

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    "By all means" would change the meaning IMO. I want to say that I do agree with them. So?

    Nyggus
    If you want to agree with them, simply say so, as in: ". . . and I agree with them."

    If you want to be a bit less direct, you could use: ". . . and by no means do I disagree with them."

    The first implies your agreement is strong and clear.

    The second indicates that you might have some other point to make.

    For example, your thought pattern might be: "As Smith and Windmill (1999) claim, this procedure can be used for any problem mentioned above, and by no means do I disagree with them. However, they fail to point out the fact that . . .."

    Hope this helps!
    Last edited by RedMtl; 20-Feb-2008 at 03:50.

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    #5

    Re: by no means

    Quote Originally Posted by RedMtl View Post
    If you want to agree with them, simply say so, as in: ". . . and I agree with them."

    If you want to be a bit less direct, you could use: ". . . and by no means do I disagree with them."

    The first implies your agreement is strong and clear.

    The second indicates that you might have some other point to make.

    For example, your though pattern might be: "As Smith and Windmill (1999) claim, this procedure can be used for any problem mentioned above, and by no means do I disagree with them. However, they fail to point out the fact that . . .."

    Hope this helps!
    Thanks. I rather thought my version gave more emphasis to the agreement, but now see how wrong I was!

    Nyggus

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