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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    teach

    hi there

    You cannot / may not teach here without a teaching certificate.

    Which one is better?

    pete

  2. RedMtl's Avatar
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    #2

    Smile Re: teach

    Quote Originally Posted by peter123 View Post
    hi there

    You cannot / may not teach here without a teaching certificate.

    Which one is better?

    pete
    Not a case of "better." There is only one choice.

    "You cannot teach here without a teaching certificate."

    You can use may, but the context has to be a bit different. For example: "You may not teach here unless you have a teaching certificate."

    Hope this helps.

  3. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: teach

    Hi there,
    Thanks a lot.
    Any difference between these twom in tone, politeness and formality?
    What is the difference between 'can' and 'may' here?


    You cannot teach here without a teaching certificate.

    You may not teach here unless you have a teaching certificate.

    Thanks
    pete

  4. RedMtl's Avatar
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    #4

    Smile Re: teach

    Quote Originally Posted by peter123 View Post
    Hi there,
    Thanks a lot.
    Any difference between these twom in tone, politeness and formality?
    What is the difference between 'can' and 'may' here?


    You cannot teach here without a teaching certificate.

    You may not teach here unless you have a teaching certificate.

    Thanks
    pete
    "You cannot teach here without a teaching certificate" is a statement of fact. There is no option. You must have the certificate.

    "You may not teach here unless you have a teaching certificate" is politer, and rather less assertive. However, it means precisely the same thing. A certificate is required.

    It also implies, slightly, that you might be able to teach somewhere else without a certificate, but not at the place to which you currently are applying.

    Hope this helps!

  5. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: teach

    Hi there,
    then how about:

    You (cannot/ may not) teach here unless you have a teaching certificate.

    cannot-- not able to
    may not --- not allowed to do.

    Am I right?

    Thanks
    pete

  6. #6

    Smile Re: teach

    Pete, 'may not' seems grammatically correct but hardly anyone would use it. Naturally, people will prefer 'cannot'.

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