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    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #1

    How to get lucky?

    Subject: How to get lucky?
    Tips:
    A. Live a charmed life.
    B. Open your mind.
    C. Relish the upside.
    D. Learn to be lucky.


    If the book is great and fun, I call it 'an interesting book' rather than 'interested book.' When life is fantastic, I call it 'charming life.' But here why he used 'charmed'?

  1. hearingwintergone
    Guest
    #2
    "charmed life" means the life with no calamity


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #3
    It means a pleasant life. My question is why the -ed form not the -ing form?

    charmed life
    charming life
    Life should be charming, not charmed. :D

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    #4
    A charmed life = a lucky one- someone who has avoided disaster lives a 'charmed life'.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    A charmed life = a lucky one- someone who has avoided disaster lives a 'charmed life'.
    What about 'an interested book'?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #6

    Re: How to get lucky?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Subject: How to get lucky?
    Tips:
    A. Live a charmed life.
    B. Open your mind.
    C. Relish the upside.
    D. Learn to be lucky.


    If the book is great and fun, I call it 'an interesting book' rather than 'interested book.' When life is fantastic, I call it 'charming life.' But here why he used 'charmed'?
    I agree with tdol's reply. :D In addition, it's often, but not always the case that -ed expresses, altered/changed by, like this,

    a burnt tree (a tree that has been altered/changed by fire)
    a burning tree (a tree that is burning now)

    a charmed life (a life that has been altered/changed by luck)
    a charming life ( a life that is charming, pleasant)

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #7

    Re: How to get lucky?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Subject: How to get lucky?
    Tips:
    A. Live a charmed life.
    B. Open your mind.
    C. Relish the upside.
    D. Learn to be lucky.


    If the book is great and fun, I call it 'an interesting book' rather than 'interested book.' When life is fantastic, I call it 'charming life.' But here why he used 'charmed'?
    I agree with tdol's reply. :D In addition, it's often, but not always the case that -ed expresses, altered/changed by, like this,

    a burnt tree (a tree that has been altered/changed by fire)
    a burning tree (a tree that is burning now)

    a charmed life (a life that has been altered/changed by luck)
    a charming life ( a life that is charming, pleasant)

    All the best, :D
    Agreed. It's like,
    a sleeping child ( a child who is sleeping and maybe is having sweet dreams)
    A sleeping car ( a car that provides passengers space to rest or sleep)

    So back to my context, I think both can be used to get lucky. Can't they?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #8

    Re: How to get lucky?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Agreed. It's like,
    a sleeping child ( a child who is sleeping and maybe is having sweet dreams)
    A sleeping car ( a car that provides passengers space to rest or sleep)
    e.g. a sleeping child
    e.g. a sleeping car

    The first example indicates that the child is performing the action of sleeping. The second example does not indicate that the car is performing the action of sleeping--rather, the present participle tells us what kind of car it is: it's a car that is made for sleeping => a sleeping car.

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    So back to my context, I think both can be used to get lucky. Can't they?
    e.g. Live a charmed life.
    e.g. Live a charming life.

    In the first example indicates that something has charmed your life. The second example does not indicate that something has charmed your life--rather, it tells us what kind of life: a charming/pleasant life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fortune City
    a. Present participles
    Present participles used as adjectives refer to actions being performed by the things being described. In the following examples the present participles used as adjectives are underlined.

    e.g. the falling star
    the barking dog

    The first example indicates that the star is performing the action of falling. The second example indicates that the dog is performing the action of barking.

    b. Past participles
    Past participles used as adjectives refer to actions which have been performed on the things being described. In the following examples, the past participles used as adjectives are underlined.

    e.g. the scattered leaves
    the broken drum

    The first example indicates that something has scattered the leaves. The second example indicates that something has broken the drum.

    SOURCE

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