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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Question "get off of"

    Hi there,

    I have heard so many people use "off of" in a sentence, as in - "get off of me" or "I can't take my eyes off of you" and I think it sounds wrong.

    I have always believed that this is incorrect and you just use "off" - get off me...

    Can someone tell me whether or not it is actually correct to say off of or not.

    Thanks...Cheeky!


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: "get off of"

    Quote Originally Posted by CheekyMum View Post
    Hi there,

    I have heard so many people use "off of" in a sentence, as in - "get off of me" or "I can't take my eyes off of you" and I think it sounds wrong.

    I have always believed that this is incorrect and you just use "off" - get off me...

    Can someone tell me whether or not it is actually correct to say off of or not.

    Thanks...Cheeky!
    Yes, it's correct, CM. It simply adds a bit more emphasis.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: "get off of"

    It's more redundant than anything else to me.

  1. #4

    Smile Re: "get off of"

    Put simply, 'off of' is not good English - even when used for over-emphasis!


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #5

    Re: "get off of"

    Language science disagrees with Shakespeare's brother.

    How old are you, SB? Are there any other siblings alive?

  2. #6

    Smile Re: "get off of"

    Riverkid, please please please explain Language Science. It is a most unusual tag for a mode of communication that is not exact...as you have in fact testified to!

    But seriously...'off of'? Is it popular in Canada? Because it grates on me as I'm sure it does for my younger brother too.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #7

    Re: "get off of"

    Quote Originally Posted by Shakespeare's brother View Post
    Riverkid, please please please explain Language Science.

    Hello, S'sB.

    Language science, rightfully, acknowledges that there are forms, often disparaged, that have a place in language. Things common to speech don't have to be measured against what is used in formal/written English to qualify as serviceable/good language.


    It is a most unusual tag for a mode of communication that is not exact...as you have in fact testified to!

    I don't understand what you mean here, SB.

    But seriously...'off of'? Is it popular in Canada? Because it grates on me as I'm sure it does for my younger brother too.
    'popular' isn't the test for any given collocation. But it is in use in all dialects of English, most certainly it is.

    UK
    Results 1 - 10 of about 40,000 English pages for "get off of".

    USA
    Results 1 - 10 of about 547,000 English pages for "get off of".

    Canada
    Results 1 - 10 of about 80,300 English pages for "get off of".

    Australia
    Results 1 - 10 of about 17,000 English pages for "get off of".

    NZ
    Results 1 - 10 of about 2,230 English pages for "get off of".

    How much something grates on a body isn't really any sound test of language suitability, is it?

    It probably wouldn't have bothered Ole Will at all, SB. Have a read here.


    Why Shakespeare Didn't Know Grammar

    Why Shakespeare Didn't Know Grammar


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #8

    Re: "get off of"

    ####%%%^&*()_@@@@@@@


    What is with this selective holding posts out until they are "approved" by a moderator? It pulled out my original but let's this nonsense post, above, thru. ???????????????

  3. #9

    Talking Re: "get off of"

    Obviously, what you had to say originally had not been deemed worthy. SB.

  4. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 620
    #10

    Re: "get off of"

    Some dictionaries categorize 'off of' as an idiom which is especially common in spoken English. Personally, I don't really think people add 'of' for emphasis; I think 'off of' is in fact simply idiomatic.

    I've also read that the usage is quite old, going back to at least the 16th century.

    Gosh, I'd hate to see the following lyrics changed as a result of some overly zealous idea of grammatical propriety:

    You're just too good to be true.
    Can't take my eyes off of you.


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