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    #1

    all for the best

    Dear teachers,

    The following is from an exercise in my textbook. Could you please explain if the following sentence makes sense? I don't think it is correct.

    I'm all for the best pleased to teach my daughter how to use the computer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: all for the best

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    The following is from an exercise in my textbook. Could you please explain if the following sentence makes sense? I don't think it is correct.

    I'm all for the best pleased to teach my daughter how to use the computer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    I agree - it doesn't make sense!

    I'm glad/happy to teach my daughter how to use [the computer]/[computers]

    I will be pleased if you teach my daughter....

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: all for the best

    No sense at all!

    There could be a hint of this meaning too:

    It's all for the best if my daughter's IT lessons at school prepare her for the lessons I give her.

    b

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    #4

    Re: all for the best

    Dear Anglika,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it. The exercise goes like this:

    Complete the sentences with the expression listed below in thier proer forms.

    (all) for the best, at the edge of, in serach of, in sth's or sb's place, to blow itself out, to come into focus, to quiet down, to work one's way out of.

    I can fill others with the phrases above but I can't choose one to finish the sentence I cited last time. After I finished other sentences only 'all for the best' left. But as I wondered it doesn't make sense. Could you please see if I can choose from the rest to complete the sentence:

    I'm___________ pleased _______ teach my daughter how to use the computer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I agree - it doesn't make sense!

    I'm glad/happy to teach my daughter how to use [the computer]/[computers]

    I will be pleased if you teach my daughter....

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    #5

    Re: all for the best

    Dear BobK,

    Thankyou very much for your explanation. The following is what I replied just now:


    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it. The exercise goes like this:

    Complete the sentences with the expression listed below in thier proer forms.

    (all) for the best, at the edge of, in serach of, in sth's or sb's place, to blow itself out, to come into focus, to quiet down, to work one's way out of.

    I can fill others with the phrases above but I can't choose one to finish the sentence I cited last time. After I finished other sentences only 'all for the best' left. But as I wondered it doesn't make sense. Could you please see if I can choose from the rest to complete the sentence:

    I'm___________ pleased _______ teach my daughter how to use the computer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No sense at all!

    There could be a hint of this meaning too:

    It's all for the best if my daughter's IT lessons at school prepare her for the lessons I give her.

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: all for the best

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear BobK,

    Thankyou very much for your explanation. The following is what I replied just now:


    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it. The exercise goes like this:

    Complete the sentences with the expression listed below in thier proer forms.

    (all) for the best, at the edge of, in serach of, in sth's or sb's place, to blow itself out, to come into focus, to quiet down, to work one's way out of.

    I can fill others with the phrases above but I can't choose one to finish the sentence I cited last time. After I finished other sentences only 'all for the best' left. But as I wondered it doesn't make sense. Could you please see if I can choose from the rest to complete the sentence:

    I'm___________ pleased _______ teach my daughter how to use the computer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Sorry Jiang - I can't help. Maybe there's an idiom missing from the list? - 'I'm only too pleased to teach my daughter...'. ['only too' is rather like 'extremely', but has in addition the implication that the listener might expect something different: 'Don't feel embarrassed about dropping in whenever you're passing. I'd be only too pleased to have a chat about old times - there's really no need to be shy.']

    b

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    #7

    Re: all for the best



    Dear BobK,

    Thank you so much for your help! You have found the key! The phrases in the exercises are taken from the text and the text does have the expression 'only too'. Now I see it is the textbook writers who made a serious mistake. They should have included 'only too'.

    Thank you again for your help.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Sorry Jiang - I can't help. Maybe there's an idiom missing from the list? - 'I'm only too pleased to teach my daughter...'. ['only too' is rather like 'extremely', but has in addition the implication that the listener might expect something different: 'Don't feel embarrassed about dropping in whenever you're passing. I'd be only too pleased to have a chat about old times - there's really no need to be shy.']

    b

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