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    #1

    outdoor

    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:
    The climate makes it possible for the animals to live outdoors most of the year.
    I think I can also use 'outside' in this sentence. Is that right? Or may I say 'outside' and 'outdoors' are interchangeable?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #2

    Re: outdoor

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:
    The climate makes it possible for the animals to live outdoors most of the year.
    I think I can also use 'outside' in this sentence. Is that right? Or may I say 'outside' and 'outdoors' are interchangeable?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    I may well be mistaken but 'outside' seems to be connected to houses, while 'outdoors' just means outside the confines of buildings used for animal shelter.


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    #3

    Re: outdoor

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused. The following is from the dictionary:

    1. outside
    It was a lovely day outside.
    Since it's such a nice day shall we eat/sit/go outside?
    an outside light/toilet
    2. outdoors
    If the weather's good, we'll eat outdoors (= not in a building).
    Every year he takes a month off work to go trekking in the great outdoors (= in the countryside, far away from towns).

    I can't distinguish them. Could you please explain them to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    I may well be mistaken but 'outside' seems to be connected to houses, while 'outdoors' just means outside the confines of buildings used for animal shelter.



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    #4

    Re: outdoor

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused.

    Me too, Jiang. Didn't you see my double confused emoticon?

    The following is from the dictionary:

    1. outside
    It was a lovely day outside.
    Since it's such a nice day shall we eat/sit/go outside?
    an outside light/toilet
    2. outdoors
    If the weather's good, we'll eat outdoors (= not in a building).
    Every year he takes a month off work to go trekking in the great outdoors (= in the countryside, far away from towns).

    I can't distinguish them. Could you please explain them to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    I said, and I have to reiterate that I may be mistaken. However, the dictionary entry you've provided/you provided only relates to people. Your original was abut animals,

    The climate makes it possible for the animals to live outdoors most of the year.

    I still feel, albeit, not all that strongly, that 'outside' isn't used in the same way as outdoors for animals, for this context.

    Now, of course, you can say, "Take the horse outside", if it's in a barn, whereas "Take the horse outdoors" wouldn't sound quite right.

    I can't explain it any better and again, I might be out to lunch, but for this context, I don't think that they are comparable. Why not try creating some example sentences and maybe that'll help me/us see something?


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    #5

    Re: outdoor

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused.

    Me too, Jiang. Didn't you see my double confused emoticon?

    The following is from the dictionary:

    1. outside
    It was a lovely day outside.
    Since it's such a nice day shall we eat/sit/go outside?
    an outside light/toilet
    2. outdoors
    If the weather's good, we'll eat outdoors (= not in a building).
    Every year he takes a month off work to go trekking in the great outdoors (= in the countryside, far away from towns).

    I can't distinguish them. Could you please explain them to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    I said, and I have to reiterate that I may be mistaken. However, the dictionary entry you've provided/you provided only relates to people. Your original was abut animals,

    The climate makes it possible for the animals to live outdoors most of the year.

    I still feel, albeit, not all that strongly, that 'outside' isn't used in the same way as outdoors for animals, for this context.

    Now, of course, you can say, "Take the horse outside", if it's in a barn, whereas "Take the horse outdoors" wouldn't sound quite right.

    I can't explain it any better and again, I might be out to lunch, but for this context, I don't think that they are comparable. Why not try creating some example sentences and maybe that'll help me/us see something?

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    #6

    Re: outdoor

    Attention: I'm not a teacher.

    Hi jiang,

    outdoor = located in, done in, or suited to the open air,

    "Badmington and other outdoor games."

    out-of-door = located, suited for, or taking place in the open air

    outside (adv.) = outdoors

    outdoor (adj.) = open-air, out-of-door(s), outside

    Regards.

    V.

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    #7

    Re: outdoor

    Dear vil,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. So they mean the same thing.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Attention: I'm not a teacher.

    Hi jiang,

    outdoor = located in, done in, or suited to the open air,

    "Badmington and other outdoor games."

    out-of-door = located, suited for, or taking place in the open air

    outside (adv.) = outdoors

    outdoor (adj.) = open-air, out-of-door(s), outside

    Regards.

    V.

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    #8

    Re: outdoor

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your help.
    The original sentence is from my textbook while the other examples are from Camridge Dictionary.

    I have found more from Merrium Webster's Dictionary but it only provided definitions:

    outside:
    1 : on or to the outside 2 : outdoors
    outdoors:
    outside a building : in or into the open air

    I also found in American English:
    outside
    adverb, preposition, adjective
    Hordes of cats howled outside the window.
    outdoors
    adverb [not gradable]
    out in the air, not in a building
    We'll eat outdoors.
    The kids are playing outdoors.

    Jiang






    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused.

    Me too, Jiang. Didn't you see my double confused emoticon?

    The following is from the dictionary:

    1. outside
    It was a lovely day outside.
    Since it's such a nice day shall we eat/sit/go outside?
    an outside light/toilet
    2. outdoors
    If the weather's good, we'll eat outdoors (= not in a building).
    Every year he takes a month off work to go trekking in the great outdoors (= in the countryside, far away from towns).

    I can't distinguish them. Could you please explain them to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    I said, and I have to reiterate that I may be mistaken. However, the dictionary entry you've provided/you provided only relates to people. Your original was abut animals,

    The climate makes it possible for the animals to live outdoors most of the year.

    I still feel, albeit, not all that strongly, that 'outside' isn't used in the same way as outdoors for animals, for this context.

    Now, of course, you can say, "Take the horse outside", if it's in a barn, whereas "Take the horse outdoors" wouldn't sound quite right.

    I can't explain it any better and again, I might be out to lunch, but for this context, I don't think that they are comparable. Why not try creating some example sentences and maybe that'll help me/us see something?

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