Results 1 to 4 of 4

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Michiru is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2

    Post Out of expectation

    Hello!
    I am not sure if "out of expectation" means
    "as I expected"
    or "beyond my expectation".

    I remember when I first came across the phrase it meant "as I expected".
    However, people around me started telling me it means "beyond my expectation".
    I can't find this phrase in my idiom reference books
    so if anyone knows the true meaning to it please kindly tell me.
    (If you have any reference please do quote. thanks.)

    Thanks for everyone's help!

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,397

    Re: Out of expectation

    Welcome to the forums.

    Could you give the full context or sentence where you met this phrase?

  3. #3
    Michiru is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2

    Re: Out of expectation

    Humm... I don't know if this phrase is popular in native speakers or not.
    But Hong Kong students always use this word in their compositions.
    I am not sure if "out of expectation" means "Within my expectation (as expected" or "Beyond my expectation (unexpected)".

    I wonder which sentence makes sense in the followings:
    For example,
    *The weather was fine in the morning.*

    1. Out of my expectation ,the sun was shining brightly for the whole afternoon.
    2. Out of my expectation, it started to rain in the afternoon.

    Thanks :)

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,397

    Re: Out of expectation

    Quote Originally Posted by Michiru View Post
    Humm... I don't know if this phrase is popular in native speakers or not.
    But Hong Kong students always use this word in their compositions.
    I am not sure if "out of expectation" means "Within my expectation (as expected" or "Beyond my expectation (unexpected)".

    I wonder which sentence makes sense in the followings:
    For example,
    *The weather was fine in the morning.*

    1. Out of my expectation ,the sun was shining brightly for the whole afternoon.
    2. Out of my expectation, it started to rain in the afternoon.

    Thanks :)
    It is certainly not an expression used by native speakers. It would seem to be a classic example of how language changes.

    Unexpectedly / To my surprise, .... would be the way this is normally expressed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •