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Thread: some or some o


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #21

    Re: some or some of

    You could, in casual fast speech, hear "some a you guys" where 'of' is pronounced as 'a' and it's attached to 'some' -->> suma; the 'a' can be virtually eclipsed so the whole phrase sounds like 'some you guys'.

    Some you guys come over here and hep me. The resta you guys go with Jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    No - it's always 'some of you guys'.
    The only time you would not use this, is within my hearing range please!
    I have a revulsion for this Americanism where boys and girls are referred to collectively in this way.
    'guys' is sometimes, not always, a gender neutral term that is used as a substitute for 'everybody/everyone'.

  1. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #22

    Re: some or some o

    Hi Riverkid.

    Excellent comment.

    I hadn't thought of it that way but you're absolutely right. Looks like Canadian English works the same way as British English. I would probably do the same, in spoken English (but not in writing).

    The only tweak I would make, for those whose 1st language isn't English, would be to write the phonetic "suma" as "summa', so as not to rhyme with "sumo", the Japanese wrestlers!

    PS I was talking to an American lady last night, who said she had seen a dictionary that translates American English to British English and vice versa. She wished she had bought it at the time. Do any of you out there know which one she might have seen?

    PPS I'm still looking out for a copy of the Cynic's Dictionary. It has delightful comments, if I remember rightly, such as "Plan: Means of demonstrating that a purely accidental, positive outcome was an integral part of your original strategy". The trouble is, there are some people that might assume it to be a regular dictionary, when they bought it!

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    #23

    Re: some or some o

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post

    PPS I'm still looking out for a copy of the Cynic's Dictionary.
    While your hunt goes on, my list of links includes a link to the original - Ambrose Bierce's 'Devil's Dictionary'.

  3. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #24

    Re: some or some o

    Hi Stuartnz.

    Many thanks for your reference.

    I checked out the verb "plan" in the online "Devil's Dictionary" [ The Devil's Dictionary Dot Com ]
    and it gives:

    PLAN, v.t. To bother about the best method of accomplishing an accidental result.

    Just what I was looking for!

    Regards


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    #25

    Re: some or some o

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post

    The only tweak I would make, for those whose 1st language isn't English, would be to write the phonetic "suma" as "summa', so as not to rhyme with "sumo", the Japanese wrestlers!

    PS I was talking to an American lady last night, who said she had seen a dictionary that translates American English to British English and vice versa. She wished she had bought it at the time. Do any of you out there know which one she might have seen?

    PPS I'm still looking out for a copy of the Cynic's Dictionary. It has delightful comments, if I remember rightly, such as "Plan: Means of demonstrating that a purely accidental, positive outcome was an integral part of your original strategy". The trouble is, there are some people that might assume it to be a regular dictionary, when they bought it!
    Howdy, NT. I agree with you on the summa. I'm afraid I can't help you on either type of dictionary though from the two examples here, yours and Stuart's, I think they might be more accurate than real dictionaries.

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