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  1. #1
    vscid is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    39

    correct idiom

    1] It is imperative that I study hard to pass in the exam.
    2] It is imperative to study hard for me to pass in the exam.

    Which is correct between 1 and 2 and why?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    210

    Re: correct idiom

    The first one is correct.

    As for the second one, consider:


    It is imperative for me to study hard to pass in the exam.

    for me= Subject for the nin-finite verb "to study" and there is no need to repeat it, i.e. "for me to pass in the exam".

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    5,403

    Re: correct idiom

    Cambridge Dictionary:

    imperative (= URGENT)
    extremely important or urgent; needing to be done or given attention immediately:
    [+ that] The president said it was imperative that the release of all hostages be secured.
    [+ to infinitive] It's imperative to act now before the problem gets really serious.

  4. #4
    vscid is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    39

    Re: correct idiom

    how about 'imperative for' as suggested by mohammed above?

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