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    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 64
    #1

    grammar

    I would appreciate it, if someone could give me some brief explanation about how to use 'who has', 'with' and 'in' in relative clauses to mean 'possess'.(I am not a native English speaker, so I often get confused about that.) For example, which is better to say in these situations?

    The man with/who has a bag in his hand is the journalist.(Are both acceptable?)
    or,
    The man in/who has/with a black suit is the journalist(which one is correct and why, please)
    or,
    The man with/who has long curly hair is the journalist.(Are both ok?)


    Last edited by eddkzk; 16-Mar-2008 at 01:17.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by eddkzk View Post
    I would appreciate it, if someone could give me some brief explanation about how to use 'who has', 'with' and 'in' in relative clauses to mean 'possess'.(I am not a native English speaker, so I often get confused about that.) For example, which is better to say in these situations?

    The man with/who has a bag in his hand is the journalist.(Are both acceptable?) These are fine and mean the same
    or,
    The man in/who has/with a black suit is the journalist(which one is correct and why, please) "The man in a black suit" is clearly wearing it; "who has" or "with" could just mean he owns a black suit.
    or,
    The man with/who has long curly hair is the journalist.(Are both ok?) Both are fine and mean the same.


    .

  1. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
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      • Poland
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    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #3

    Smile Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by eddkzk View Post
    I would appreciate it, if someone could give me some brief explanation about how to use 'who has', 'with' and 'in' in relative clauses to mean 'possess'.(I am not a native English speaker, so I often get confused about that.) For example, which is better to say in these situations?

    The man with/who has a bag in his hand is the journalist.(Are both acceptable?)
    or,
    The man in/who has/with a black suit is the journalist(which one is correct and why, please)
    or,
    The man with/who has long curly hair is the journalist.(Are both ok?)


    They are absolutely fine.

    The man with a bag in his hand is the journalist.
    The man carrying/having a bag in his hand is the journalist.
    The man who is carrying/who has a bag in his hand is the journalist.


    The man in a black suit is the journalist.
    The man wearing/dressed in/clad in a black suit is the journalist.
    The man who is (dressed/clad) in a black suit is the journalist.


    The man with a black suit... would mean The man carrying a black suit or having it somewhere else.

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