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  1. #1
    beachboy is offline Key Member
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    Present perfect (continuous)

    I've visited some links, but I'm still not sure about the difference between:
    I've lived in this house for 9 years
    I've been living in this house for 9 years

  2. #2
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Wink Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    I've visited some links, but I'm still not sure about the difference between:
    I've lived in this house for 9 years
    I've been living in this house for 9 years
    My advice - just treat these sentences as having the same meaning.

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Attention: Iím not a teacher.

    Hi beachboy,

    I've lived in this house for 9 years
    I've been living in this house for 9 years

    Originally Posted by engee30,
    My advice - just treat these sentences as having the same meaning.


    Often there is very little difference between the Present Perfect Simple and the Present Perfect Continuous. In many cases both are equally acceptable.

    To emphasize the action, we use the continuous form.

    To emphasize the result of action, we use the simple form.

    We have worked at the problem for several months. (The fact is emphasized.)

    We have been working and working at the problem for months and I donít think we are likely to solve it. (The process is emphasized.)

    I would give you an example with some more sentences in order to show off the difference between the Present Perfect and the Present Perfect Continuous.

    He has made some experiments.
    He has been making experiments.

    The Present Perfect denotes a completed action while with the Present Perfect Continuous Exclusive there is an implication of incompleteness.

    I would modify your example above in order to use both the Present Perfect and the Present Perfect Continuous. I wrote yours both sentences in much the same manner but in the same time in a different way.

    I have lived in this house for 9 years, and she has been living in this house for 11 years.

    Regards.

    V.

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    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    I believe "has been living" is considered Past Perfect Progressive.

  5. #5
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Correction:

    "Has been living" is Present Perfect Progressive.

  6. #6
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Present Perfect Progressive = Present Perfect Continuous

    progressive adj. = advanced, advancing, continuing, developing

    Regards.

    V.

  7. #7
    beachboy is offline Key Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Thanks, Vil. I'd say I'm kind of familiar with both PP and PPC, and the many cases where they can be used. My problem is when it comes to using the conjunction/preposition since. I'd love it if I were assured that there isn't any difference in terms of conceptual meaning between the sentences I wrote, just because at this moment I can't feel the difference... But I'm always eager to learn.

  8. #8
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Present perfect (continuous)

    Attention: Iím not a teacher.

    V.

    Hi beachboy,

    I will try to dispel your diffidence and put an end to all doubt concerning the subtle difference between the Present Perfect Progressive and Present Perfect Simple.

    Annís clothes are covered in paint. She has been painting the ceiling.

    We are interested in the action. It does not matter whether something has been finished or not. In the example, the action has not been finished.

    Here are some pairs of examples:

    Tomís hands are very dirty. He has been fixing the car.

    You have been smoking too much lately. You should smoke less.

    We use the progressive form to say how long something has been happening:

    Ann has been writing letters all day.

    How long have you been reading that book?

    Jim has been playing tennis since 2000.

    The ceiling was white. Now it is blue. She has painted the ceiling.

    This time, the important thing is that something has been finished. We are interested in the result of the action, not in the action itself.

    The car is working again now. Tom has fixed it.

    Somebody has smoked all my cigarettes. The packet is empty.

    We use the Simple form to say how much we have done, how many things we have done, or how many times we have done something.

    Ann has written ten letters today.

    How many pages of that book have you read?

    Jim has played tennis three times this week.

    Regards.

    V.

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