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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    consideration and proverb

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    1. "No more considering. Yes or no."
    May I use 'consideration' in the sentence instead of 'considering'?

    2. In my textbook there is the proverb "Oak may bend but will not break" I can't find it in my dictionaries. Could you please kindly explain the meaning of it?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang

  2. #2
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Re: consideration and proverb

    1. "No more considering. Yes or no."
    May I use 'consideration' in the sentence instead of 'considering'?
    No, consideration is a noun. You are telling the person to stop the action of considering. He must answer YES or NO.

    2. In my textbook there is the proverb "Oak may bend but will not break" I can't find it in my dictionaries. Could you please kindly explain the meaning of it? Some say the Oak is the mightiest of trees. It can withstand storms and grows to an old age. It is a symbol of strength. This proverb tells us that if we are like the Oak, we will bend (be challenged) at difficult times, but we will not break (become defeated).

  3. #3
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    Re: consideration and proverb

    We can use both words in the situation where a person would say this, but a native speaker would phrase them differently.
    Let's imagine the situation is, I'm selling my car, and you're interested in buyng it, but want to think it over. I wait a day or two and ring you, (because if you're not going to buy it, I need to keep trying to find another buyer.)
    When I ask you for your decision, you say, I'm still thinking about/considering it. I think, heck, you've already had a couple of days to do that...so I say :
    "Enough considering - do you want to buy it or not?"
    "No more considering. Make up your mind. Are you going to buy it or not?
    Actually, he is quoting what the person has said, and so ON PAPER what the sentence looks like is:
    Enough "considering" - do you want...
    The full sentence implied would be:
    "Enough of saying, 'I'm still considering'. Do you want..."

    To use 'consideration', the sentence becomes more of a mouthful, and more formal, something like:
    You've had plenty of time for consideration.
    (I don't really like that sentence - a native speaker would say, You've had plenty of time to consider)
    (let me keep thinking and see if I can come up with a better one using 'consideration')

  4. #4
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Re: consideration and proverb

    Dear susiedqq,

    Thank you so much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Best wishes,

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    1. "No more considering. Yes or no."
    May I use 'consideration' in the sentence instead of 'considering'?
    No, consideration is a noun. You are telling the person to stop the action of considering. He must answer YES or NO.

    2. In my textbook there is the proverb "Oak may bend but will not break" I can't find it in my dictionaries. Could you please kindly explain the meaning of it? Some say the Oak is the mightiest of trees. It can withstand storms and grows to an old age. It is a symbol of strength. This proverb tells us that if we are like the Oak, we will bend (be challenged) at difficult times, but we will not break (become defeated).

  5. #5
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Re: consideration and proverb

    Dear David,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    We can use both words in the situation where a person would say this, but a native speaker would phrase them differently.
    Let's imagine the situation is, I'm selling my car, and you're interested in buyng it, but want to think it over. I wait a day or two and ring you, (because if you're not going to buy it, I need to keep trying to find another buyer.)
    When I ask you for your decision, you say, I'm still thinking about/considering it. I think, heck, you've already had a couple of days to do that...so I say :
    "Enough considering - do you want to buy it or not?"
    "No more considering. Make up your mind. Are you going to buy it or not?
    Actually, he is quoting what the person has said, and so ON PAPER what the sentence looks like is:
    Enough "considering" - do you want...
    The full sentence implied would be:
    "Enough of saying, 'I'm still considering'. Do you want..."

    To use 'consideration', the sentence becomes more of a mouthful, and more formal, something like:
    You've had plenty of time for consideration.
    (I don't really like that sentence - a native speaker would say, You've had plenty of time to consider)
    (let me keep thinking and see if I can come up with a better one using 'consideration')

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