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Thread: got and has got

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #11

    Cool Re: got and has got

    Quote Originally Posted by stuartnz View Post
    I'm not a teacher, and I feel a bit awkward about complicating this, but there is another way to parse "she has just got a gift." Here's an example:

    The woman in question has just (that is, in the immediate past, very recently) done something which has surprised or amazed someone. The person thus surprised asks a third person, "How did she do that?" and the response is "She's just got a gift". Here "just" doe not talk about time, but could be thought of as meaning, "only" or "simply". So, "She's just got a gift" in the situation I've described would mean, "the only explanation I can give is that she has a gift(talent, or natural flair or ability)"
    Wow, I got really impressed by the way you parsed the sentence.
    This time you were talking about a feature, which is not exactly the same as possession, let alone a recent event of receiving something.

  2. stuartnz's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: got and has got

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    This time you were talking about a feature, which is not exactly the same as possession, let alone a recent event of receiving something.
    I suspect that if you asked most native speakers who are not trained as English teachers to assess the usage I outlined, they would associate it with the idea of possession. "Where did she get that great voice?" "it's something she has", "something she was born with". It's the sort of thorny one that lets me know it's time to call in the professionals.


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    #13

    Re: got and has got

    Good analysis, Stuart. Until I got to a certain point in your description, that meaning just hadn't occurred to me. You must have a gift.

    I don't think the pros have all these differences sorted out either. To me 'having a brother or sister' is a kind of possession, so here, I disagree a wee bit with you, Engee, but it isn't all that important. Students just have to understand how and where it's used.

    Now I'm gonna throw a wrench [a spanner, for you Brits; what word do NZlanders use?] in the works.

    For NaE the present perfect form uses [always, I'm not sure] the past participle form 'gotten' to discuss the meaning of acquired/received/etc.

    A further complication is that "She got ..." and "She's got ..." can carry the same meaning. In fast casual speech, <'s> & <'ve> can be missed because it is often unvoiced or almost unvoiced.

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    #14

    Exclamation Re: got and has got

    Has/have as auxiliay verb, used independently to show possession; Example - She has a bike. But here we are talking about verb "got" which indicates action meaning acquisition. So this is simply a difference between use of two tense forms i.e. past simple and present ferfect. We use the past simple to talk about an event which happened at some point in time in the past. Example: She got a bike two weeks ago. We use present perfect for actios just completed. Example: She has got a bike today.

  4. engee30's Avatar
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    #15

    Cool Re: got and has got

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    Has/have as auxiliay verb, used independently to show possession; Example - She has a bike.
    In your sentence, the verb has is not an auxiliary verb, it's a lexical verb (or a full/main verb).

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