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  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool Agenda free

    If we say of a writer he's unbiased, apolitical, and agenda-free, what does it mean this "agenda-free"? May it mean he doesn't make commitments, don't get involved in any cause, ideal, or vindication?

    Thank You

  2. stuartnz's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Agenda free

    I'm not a teacher, but I'd say you're close to the meaning. However, rather than meaning that he doesn't get involved in any cause or ideal, I'd say being agenda-free means he's not promoting any particular cause in his writing. He may have his own opinions on a subject, and may be involved in causes related to that subject, but he does not promote or advertise that in his writings.

  3. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #3

    Cool Re: Agenda free

    Quote Originally Posted by stuartnz View Post
    I'm not a teacher, but I'd say you're close to the meaning. However, rather than meaning that he doesn't get involved in any cause or ideal, I'd say being agenda-free means he's not promoting any particular cause in his writing. He may have his own opinions on a subject, and may be involved in causes related to that subject, but he does not promote or advertise that in his writings.
    Thanks a lot for your attention. But, let me ask you for a word which could define more precisely all these nuances you bring in and that "agenda-free" may connote.

    Very grateful again,

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Agenda free

    Originally, "agenda" meant (and still means) a list of things to discuss at a meeting. If someone particularly wanted something discussed, his secretary would say 'I'll put it on the agenda' [the implication being that this was a sure way to get it discussed].

    So, figuratively, when we say someone 'has an agenda' it means that they have (possibly secret) intentions. "Agenda-free" is an extension of that idea.

    b

  5. stuartnz's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Agenda free

    Perhaps words like objective, dispassionate or neutral might be worth considering.

  6. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Agenda free

    Although not a teacher, as a Brit, I would understand "Agenda-free" as meaning that he/she didn't have a "hidden agenda" i.e. didn't have any ulterior motive or undivulged plan behind what they were saying or doing.

    See the reference below, from the Compact Oxford Dictionary:

    AskOxford: Search Results
    hidden agenda


    noun an ulterior motive or undivulged plan.

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