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  1. banderas's Avatar
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    #1

    did not to mean to offend

    I am embarrassed to ask but the reason I do it is that I am confused. So who shall I ask if not native speakers. The second reason is that I feel that these expressions are very common. If really offensive, they should not be used to such an extent.


    I hear many expressions which my dictionary listed as offensive. So I should not use them or at least be careful where to use them and with whom.That is clear. Usage depends on the situation and circumstances. That is clear too.

    I wonder which ones are really offensive and which ones are listed as offensive by my dictionary only? If you are offended by this post just ingnore it, please but it is not my intention to offend anyone.
    Here go the words:

    1.bu.mer
    2. bu.ger
    3. s.it
    4. da.n
    6. basta.d, said to or about someone
    7. fa.got, said about someone
    8. f.cking hell
    9. pis. off
    10.be.t up
    11.s.d .off
    12.c.nt
    which ones should I avoid any aty price?

    thanks
    Last edited by banderas; 27-Mar-2008 at 17:05.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    I am embarrassed to ask but the reason I do it is that I am confused. So who shall I ask if not native speakers. The second reason is that I feel that these expressions are very common. If really offensive, they should not be used to such an extent.


    I hear many expressions which my dictionary listed as offensive. So I should not use them or at least be careful where to use them and with whom.That is clear. Usage depends on the situation and circumstances. That is clear too.

    I wonder which ones are really offensive and which ones are listed as offensive by my dictionary only? If you are offended by this post just ingnore it, please but it is not my intention to offend anyone.
    Here go the words:

    1.bu.mer Not too offensive, but quite informal
    2. bu.ger Can be offensive, but often used in collocations like 'jammy b....' [='lucky person]. With the same meaning, "jammy" collocates also with "devil", which is quite convenient if you start saying the first one and then think better of it
    3. s.it Depends on company, and whether the word is used figuratively - if it means 'annoying bureaucracy' or 'insincere dealing' (as in 'Don't give me that s... - I know what you really mean'') it's less offensive than if it means "excrement". Safer for use with friends, or in other informal contexts.
    4. da.n Quite mild; some would think it old-fashioned when used as a stand-alone swear word ("d... you"), but it's in current use in the expression 'give a d...' [=care]
    6. basta.d, said to or about someone As for 2 - collocates with "jammy". Also "silly b...." is a fairly mild (sometimes jocular) all-purpose term of abuse.
    ...
    No time for more today. [I'm ducking out before I get to the ones you should really avoid ]

    b

  3. banderas's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    thanks, BobK for showing courage to comment on them. I did not expect anyone to have a say because this topic might be considered by many as politically incorrect. Anyway every one is most welcome to give a witty comment/ make a remark.
    cheers
    Last edited by banderas; 27-Mar-2008 at 18:21.

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    I wonder which ones are really offensive and which ones are listed as offensive by my dictionary only? If you are offended by this post just ingnore it, please but it is not my intention to offend anyone.
    A lot of these are British usage (in fact, there are a few that I can't figure out), and won't get a reaction from AmE speakers. Some others are universally offensive.

    Here go the words:

    1.bu.mer
    2. bu.ger
    I can only guess at these - bummer? bugger?
    In AmE, a "bummer" is something disappointing. "Oh, you didn't get that promotion? That's a bummer."
    I only know about "bugger" from reading books about the British royal family; the word is not commonly used in AmE.
    3. s.it
    Very commonly used, but still considered a curse word, and isn't used, say, on television or radio. I wouldn't utter it in front of someone I've just met, or during a business meeting, but otherwise it's not all that offensive.
    4. da.n
    A very mild expletive. Even my dear sweet 70-something mother uses it without flinching.
    6. basta.d, said to or about someone
    If used in the literal sense, meaning a child of unmarried partners, it's rather blunt but not profane. To describe someone despicable or vicious, it's considered a profanity, but it is very commonly used. You should consider the person with whom you're speaking; do they seem very prim and proper and easily offended? Then avoid this word. Otherwise, they probably won't raise an eyebrow if you use it.
    7. fa.got, said about someone
    Considered extremely offensive in AmE. Could be considered "hate speech."
    8. f.cking hell
    Any phrase involving the dreaded "F bomb" (as f.ck is often described) is extremely profane and should be confined to casual conversation among friends.
    9. pis. off
    Sort of semi-naughty. Again, most people won't react one way or another if you say it, but there might be a few who are still offended by it.
    10.be.t up
    No clue as to what this is supposed to say.
    11.s.d .off
    Sod off is strictly British usage; most Americans would presume you were referring to grass and landscaping when you mention "sod."
    12.c.nt
    This word seems to be used a bit more casually in the UK than in the US. In AmE, it is considered extremely offensive.

  5. banderas's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    Thank you, Ouisch, for your comments.
    would you give me some examples of a few Amercian words typically used by speakers, please? As you noticed, examples that I gave come from BrE.Thanks.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    ...
    7. fa.got, said about someone Best avoided; the abbreviation (first syllable only) is less offensive, but still impolite. A problem with 'fag' is that there are two other meanings; which givers lots of scope for misunderstandings:a "fag" can be either a cigarette or a personal slave-like schoolboy in a fee-paying school. (The latter is quite hard to explain; read the Flashman novels for background: Flashman);- - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
    8. f.cking hell Pretty offensive; for very informal use.
    9. pis. off Not too offensive, though quite assertive; when you say 'P*ss off' to someone you really don't want them around. Incidentally, 'p*ssed' means different things on either side of the Atlantic. A British person who is p*ssed is drunk [someone who drinks a lot can be called a 'p*ss artist' - again, informal]; whereas an American who is p*ssed is angry [a British person who is angry is 'p*ssed off']. Confused
    10.be.t up Is the . an L or an A? "Belt up" is very tame and rather dated.
    ...
    Gotta go.

    b

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: did not to mean to offend

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    ...
    11.s.d .off
    12.c.nt
    ...
    And, to conclude, 11 is quite offensive, and the use of "s*d" as an expletive (referring to a sexual practice) is more so. 'Lucky s*d' is less so.

    12 is very offensive to me; some people are less sensitive than I am, but I'd think twice about ever using it. It's a lot more offensive than the 3/4 letter 'equivalents' in French and Spanish - so speakers of Latin-based languages should beware.

    b

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