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    • Join Date: Dec 2007
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    #1

    Smile grammar

    Can I say: "What are you thinking about?" (if that sentence is right , is it British or American English grammar?)

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Smile Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by longhiryu View Post
    Can I say: "What are you thinking about?" (if that sentence is right , is it British or American English grammar?)
    You don't need about in your sentence. The sentence is all right as long as you're taking about someone creating ideas in their mind. If you want to ask about someone's opinion, then the sentence is not right, and should be rewritten as What do you think?

  2. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: grammar

    There is a difference between think about and think of, that might be interesting for you.


    'think of' means 'imagine' something whereas 'think about' tends to mean something closer to 'consider'.

    Regards,
    Snowcake
    Last edited by Snowcake; 30-Mar-2008 at 13:07. Reason: wrong


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    #4

    Re: grammar

    Yes, you can say this.

    "What are you thinking about?"
    "Oh nothing, just how pretty that girl is."

  3. banderas's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    There is a difference between think about and think of, that might be interesting for you.


    'think of' means 'imagine' something whereas 'think about' tends to mean something closer to 'consider'.

    Regards,
    Snowcake
    can you chalange this?
    I am thinking of you.
    I am thinking about you.

  4. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: grammar

    No.

    I know that there is no difference in this case. However, in some cases there is a difference between of and about.

    Read this:

    Hi Cecile and thanks for your question - prepositions are a very tricky area! This is also what's known as a collocation issue...which means we need to look at which words work best in partnership with 'think of ' and 'think about.'. Basically, 'think of' usually means 'imagine' whereas 'think about' tends to mean something closer to 'consider', so the differences would arise in certain contexts. For example, if I say I'm thinking of a tropical beach, please don't interrupt me! I mean I'm imagining it or daydreaming about it. However, a sentence like 'they're thinking about whether to agree to the sale,' means they're considering the sale. In these cases, it's just natural usage patterns that tend to favour one form over another

    But when we are talking about people, we often tend to use them both in a similar way: For example, if my friend had an accident and went to hospital, I might send a card and some flowers with a message which could either read: 'I'm thinking of you,' or 'I'm thinking about you', and the meaning wouldn't be significantly different.


    Snowcake

  5. banderas's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post

    But when we are talking about people, we often tend to use them both in a similar way: For example, if my friend had an accident and went to hospital, I might send a card and some flowers with a message which could either read: 'I'm thinking of you,' or 'I'm thinking about you', and the meaning wouldn't be significantly different.


    Snowcake
    It makes sense. I wonder what our natives think of (not about) this theory?

  6. engee30's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: grammar

    There's even a better way to show the difference between the two (Snowcake provided us with very good examples indeed):

    (a meeting in a company facing bankrupting):

    As the directing manager, I promise that I shall give a hundred thousand pounds to the person that can think of (= invent/make up) an idea how to get out of the situation we have found ourselves, an idea that we can all think about (= consider).

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    #9

    Re: grammar

    Thank you, Engee. I do appreciate you being 'round. (sorry, I couldn't resist. I've just listened to The Beatles)

    Thanks for providing us with this clear example!

    Snowcake

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    #10

    Smile Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Thank you, Engee. I do appreciate you being 'round. (sorry, I couldn't resist. I've just listened to The Beatles)

    Thanks for providing us with this clear example!

    Snowcake
    You're 'willkommen'!

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