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  1. Antonio
    Guest
    #1

    Gray

    Hi Group,

    I understand that in English, gray represents something in the middle, in between. You can say for example "I had a grey day" But my question is, can I say:

    "I think we're going to have a gray year"
    "He's a gray politician"
    "It's a gray company"

    If am right or I am wrong, or If I am missing some other examples of the word gray, please let me know.
    __________________
    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.


    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 727
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    #2

    Re: Gray

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio
    Hi Group,

    I understand that in English, gray represents something in the middle, in between. You can say for example "I had a grey day" But my question is, can I say:

    "I think we're going to have a gray year"
    "He's a gray politician"
    "It's a gray company"

    If am right or I am wrong, or If I am missing some other examples of the word gray, please let me know.
    __________________
    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
    I am not familiar with the use of GREY. Blue, yes. I feel blue, I have the blues ....


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
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    #3
    You can say "gray area" (~= twilight zone), but I don't think you can talk about a "gray politician".

    FRC


    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 727
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    You can say "gray area" (~= twilight zone), but I don't think you can talk about a "gray politician".

    FRC
    The Blue and The Grey - but The Grey lost the war between the states.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
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    #5
    gray power--> the elders 8)


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    You can say "gray area" (~= twilight zone), but I don't think you can talk about a "gray politician".

    FRC
    Could be "old politician." Not sure though. :)

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
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    #7

    Re: Gray

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio
    Hi Group,

    I understand that in English, gray represents something in the middle, in between. You can say for example "I had a grey day" But my question is, can I say:

    "I think we're going to have a gray year"
    "He's a gray politician" :(
    "It's a gray company" :(

    If am right or I am wrong, or If I am missing some other examples of the word gray, please let me know.
    __________________
    Thanks in advance,
    Antonio.
    Note spelling: grey or gray. :wink: (US gray)

    Mixing white with black gives grey; grey area, fuzzy area; neither white nor black, somewhere between the two.

    "I think we're going to have a gray year" (financially fuzzy) :D
    "He's a gray politician" :(
    "It's a gray company" :(

    All the best, :D

  3. Shehz
    Guest
    #8

    Re: Gray

    According to Wikipedia...
    A grey area is a term for a border in-between two or more things that is unclearly defined, a border that is hard to define or even impossible to define, or a definition where the distinction border tends to move. There are several flavors of grey areas:
    • A grey area of definitions signifies a problem of sorting reality into clearly cut categories. Example: where is the border between erotica and pornography?
    • A grey area of law is an area where no clear law or precedent exists, or where the law has not been applied in a long time thus making it unclear if it is applicable at all.
    • A grey area of ethics signifies an ethical dilemma, where the border between right and wrong is blurred. Example: is killing always abominable?

    Grey areas are widely accepted in democratic societies and have a clear connection to the notion of tolerance, whereas in societies of totalitarianism, grey areas are typically not accepted on any level.

    Many people accept grey areas as a natural part of the human experience, whereas others may react with suspicion and a feeling of defectness or uncompleteness of any thought-system (or paradigm) accepting grey areas.
    Also... I'm American and have no clue what the difference is between "grey" and "gray".

  4. AintFoolin
    Guest
    #9

    Re: Gray

    one's the British spelling and one's the correct (ie American) spelling

    personally, i wouldn't use gray in that sense EXCEPT in the phrase 'gray area'

    if you use it anywhere else, people are liable to think you are talking about the color

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