Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #1

    nearly any

    One of my dictionaries compiled by some of China's professors of English says 'nearly' mustn't be used before 'any'. But I searched the BNC, CAE and Time CAE, and found a lot of sentences with 'nearly any'. So could we say 'nearly any' is as good as 'almost any'? And could we say 'nearly like...'?


    These sentences come from CAE:
    Green is so common before our eyes in nearly any garden that we almost forget it exists.
    The coach says it's nearly like snow.

    Could I ask native English teachers to help me please? Thank you very much.
    Last edited by joham; 02-Apr-2008 at 13:52.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: nearly any

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    One of my dictionaries compiled by some of China's professors of English says 'nearly' mustn't be used before 'any'. But I searched the BNC, CAE and Time CAE, and found a lot of sentences with 'nearly any'. So could we say 'nearly any' is as good as 'almost any'? And could we say 'nearly like...'?


    These sentences come from CAE:
    Green is so common before our eyes in nearly any garden that we almost forget it exists.
    The coach says it's nearly like snow.

    Could I ask native English teachers to help me please? Thank you very much.
    "nearly any" is a perfectly acceptable collocation, and so is "nearly like" in the right context..

    Your sentence "The coach says it's nearly like snow" implies that there is something which resembles snow.

    It's great, this park. It's nearly like being in the country
    again is saying something resembles something else.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •