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      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #1

    "stay put"

    Hi,
    I heard this expression on a movie and I would like to know what it means.
    In the context that I heard it, it seemed to mean "do not move until I come back".
    There are tens of entries for it on BMC, though, and I am not sure that all of them have the same meaning:
    "He argued that consultants were tending to stay put by the mid-1980s because of the much higher start-up....
    " Mr Povah should stay put and control the business, and deal with sales contracts ...".
    Could you help, please?
    I also would like to know if this is a colloquial and polite expression that can be used fearlessly.
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
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    #2

    Re: "stay put"

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi,
    I heard this expression on a movie and I would like to know what it means.
    In the context that I heard it, it seemed to mean "do not move until I come back".

    It sure can mean that, JC, so your instincts are probably right.

    There are tens of entries for it on BMC, though, and I am not sure that all of them have the same meaning:
    "He argued that consultants were tending to stay put by the mid-1980s because of the much higher start-up....
    " Mr Povah should stay put and control the business, and deal with sales contracts ...".
    Could you help, please?
    I also would like to know if this is a colloquial and polite expression that can be used fearlessly.
    Thanks.

    It means stay at/in one position, stick at one thing/job/task.

    I'd say that it's a bit stronger than a normal neutral, like,

    "Wait here for a moment",

    so you wouldn't want to use it in all situations.

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