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    #1

    have

    What are the origins of that damn british have got? One student argued today that it was the present perfect - some teacher apparently told her so. Help!


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    #2

    Re: have

    Quote Originally Posted by magdalena View Post
    What are the origins of that damn British have got? One student argued today that it was the present perfect - some teacher apparently told her so. Help!
    Present perfect of what verb? is the question that should be asked.

    I have got no idea - equally well expressed as I have no idea.

    "Got" is often inserted in sentences or used to replace a more specific verb. In my schooldays it was regarded as a lazy form of English and one that indicated a poor range of vocabulary.

  1. heidita's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: have

    Anglika, the question arose the other day as a member asked which was the present perfect of get .

    The phrase: I have got a toothache.

    I decided to use the AE form for the present perfect.

    I have gotten a toothache, as I have got sounds so very present simple....


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    #4

    Re: have

    Thanks - it seems that the ancient word "get" still has the capacity to confuse!

  2. banderas's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: have

    Quote Originally Posted by magdalena View Post
    What are the origins of that damn british have got? One student argued today that it was the present perfect - some teacher apparently told her so. Help!
    When we say, Banderas has got three suits, we mean he has them in his possession= he has them.
    When we say, Banderas has gotten three suits, we mean he's acquired or obtained them
    But not in British English
    Note that have got is NOT the present perfect of get, at least officialy.

    'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession but only 'have' is used when talking about actions:
    I have breakfast, not I have got breakfast.

    'Have' and 'Have got' are only used in the present simple, note that we use 'have' for the past simple or future forms.
    I will have... not I will have got.....

    What am I getting at?
    Have got is an "expressionĒ. But it originated in the present perfect of the verb to get.

    It takes the form of the present perfect but, in most cases anyway, has present tense meaning.
    How this happened???
    What is the literal meaning of the present perfect of get?
    I have got a new car =I have acquired a new car. So I can assume that I still posses the car.

    Over time, this implication has become the primary meaning of have got. What I find interesting in particular is the same thing happened with "going to".
    Iím going (to write a letter), a long time ago meant I moving in the direction of (to write a letter). Over time it has become fixed as a marker of future meaning. It can be even reduced (in spoken English) to:
    Iím gonna write a letter. This is called a drift, from self-standing, non-idiomatic lexical items to dependent, idiomatic grammatical ones.

    To sum up, in British English:
    I have got a car=I have a car, nothing to do with the present perfect form of "get" but
    I have got a car=I was given a car, a lot to do with the present perfect form of "get". The context governs all this.

    American English does not seem to have this kind of situation thanks to:
    "I have gotten a car".

    Hope this helps.

  3. heidita's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: have

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    American English does not seem to have this kind of situation thanks to:
    "I have gotten a car".

    Hope this helps.
    In this case I actually chose this form, even though I speak BE. I couldn't think of any other way (using get).

    (Banderas, why not join the fun in this thread? Sorry, your pm function is disabled)

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    #7

    Re: have

    thanks !!!

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