Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #1

    If so

    Please, teachers, could you help me out with this?

    'If so' or 'if yes' ?
    X = Y? If so, do this, if not, do that.
    Could I use 'If yes' instead of 'If so'? Is there a difference between them?

    Please, proofread these sentences:

    a) Whom will be this letter sent to?
    b) Whom this letter will be sent to?
    c) To whom this letter will be sent?
    d) To whom will be this letter sent?

    Many thanks

  2. stuartnz's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • New Zealand

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,370
    #2

    Re: If so

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Please, teachers, could you help me out with this?

    'If so' or 'if yes' ?
    X = Y? If so, do this, if not, do that.
    Could I use 'If yes' instead of 'If so'? Is there a difference between them?

    Please, proofread these sentences:

    a) Whom will be this letter sent to?
    b) Whom this letter will be sent to?
    c) To whom this letter will be sent?
    d) To whom will be this letter sent?

    Many thanks
    I'm not a teacher, but I will say that you will hear both "If yes" and "If so" used in that sort of construction.

    As for the second question, I would definitely vote for (d). The continued survival of the word "whom" is a matter for debate, as it seems to be disappearing, being replaced by "who". This should not be surprising, as all its fellow dative pronouns have long vanished from English, and the OED opens its listing for "whom" with
    The objective case of WHO: no longer current in natural colloquial speech.
    1. In an independent question. a. as indirect object (dative) or as object of a preposition (or after than).
    (e.a.)


    The option I would suggest for naturalness would be "Who will this letter be sent to?" But if one is going to use "whom" one ought also to obey the rule about not ending sentences with a preposition. Personally , on this one, I'm with the fat cigar-smoking megalomaniac who famously said of that rule, "it is nonsense up with which I shall not put".

  3. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #3

    Re: If so

    why sentences a), b) and c) are not right?

    Many thanks

  4. stuartnz's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • New Zealand

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,370
    #4

    Re: If so

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    why sentences a), b) and c) are not right?

    Many thanks
    The word order in (b) and (c) is not normal in natural English grammar, the verb's in the wrong place. (a) does not have this problem, but since the use of "whom" is most often now associated with a concern for "correctness" in adhering to written rules of grammar, (a) breaches one of those rules by ending with what would often be thought of as a preposition, "to".

    That's why I said that if I was going to use "whom" in the construction, I would use (d), because it observes all the rules that those who normally use "whom" are so inordinately fond of.

    Sorry, that should be "it observes all the rules of which those who normally use "whom" are so inordinately fond."

  5. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #5

    Re: If so

    So, this is acceptable?

    Who will this letter be sent to?

    what about this:

    Who will this car's problems fix?
    Who will fix this car's problems?
    Who will have this car's problems fixed?


    Thank you very much for answering my questions!
    Last edited by Offroad; 10-Apr-2008 at 03:36.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #6

    Re: If so

    Who will this letter be sent to?

    That's a very common way to say it. Yes, "whom" is technically correct, but rarely used in that position.

    Who will this car's problems fix? This word order makes no sense
    Who will fix this car's problems? This is okay grammatically.
    Who will have/has this car's problems fixed? Okay grammatically, but won't it be "the car's owner"?

    Do you understand the difference between "who will fix it" and "who will have it fixed"?

    -- Sorry, I don't know how to delete this double post - clicking on "delete" isn't doing it --

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #7

    Re: If so

    Who will this letter be sent to?

    That's a very common way to say it. Yes, "whom" is technically correct, but rarely used in that position.

    Who will this car's problems fix? This word order makes no sense
    Who will fix this car's problems? This is okay grammatically.
    Who will have/has this car's problems fixed? Okay grammatically, but won't it be "the car's owner"?

    Do you understand the difference between "who will fix it" and "who will have it fixed"?

  8. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #8

    Re: If so

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Do you understand the difference between "who will fix it" and "who will have it fixed"?
    I guess so, however, let me give a shot anyway:

    I will have my car cleaned, it means I will ask for or pay (for?) someone to do the cleaning service. Right?

    Can I say:

    I will pay for someone else do what I do.
    I've been paying someone else to do what I should/shall do.
    Some people waste their lives in exchange for money.

    Thanks a thousand!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •