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    #1

    Smile Say in other words

    Could you say in other words the underlined:

    "And years from now, he says, we may head to a real-time brain-imaging center the way we go to the fitness center today, and buff up parts of our brain that improve performance, memory and even intelligence. Now, that would be a real no-brainer."

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    #2

    Re: Say in other words

    Quote Originally Posted by snade17 View Post
    Could you say in other words the underlined:

    "And years from now, he says, we may head to a real-time brain-imaging center the way we go to the fitness center today, and buff up parts of our brain that improve performance, memory and even intelligence. Now, that would be a real no-brainer."
    Hi Snade17


    buff up = retrain, or perhaps sharpen

    no-brainer = winner.

    Stilo


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    #3

    Re: Say in other words

    What do you mean to say by:
    'real-time' ( I know what it means, but what do you intend it to mean with regard to CAT scans/electromagnetic imaging?)

    no-brainer: I can't grasp how this follows logically. Do you mean, that if a machine is going to do these things for the person, then the person doesn't have to use their own brain to achieve it??

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    #4

    Smile Re: Say in other words

    Hi David,
    I don't mean to say anything. I was wandering what it means. I just read it in a Reader's Digest /American, March 2007/. These are the closing lines of an article titled ""Brain Powered".

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    #5

    Re: Say in other words

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    What do you mean to say by:
    'real-time' ( I know what it means, but what do you intend it to mean with regard to CAT scans/electromagnetic imaging?)

    no-brainer: I can't grasp how this follows logically. Do you mean, that if a machine is going to do these things for the person, then the person doesn't have to use their own brain to achieve it??
    No brainer is a saying that is creeping into English, maybe from the US. It means that 'you are onto a winner/can't lose' Possibly you don't have to use your brain to sucess in the task.
    I have heard it used in house restoration, when looking at the house pre restoration and 'doing the sums'(adding up the costs involved in the purchase and restoration), means that it is a no brainer situation, ie you dont have to be an Einstein to figure out that you cannot lose, moneywise.

    Means you are on a sure fire situation/a winner
    Hope this helps

    Stilo

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