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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    Intran-sit

    I would like to ask, maybe someone can explain what does it mean INTRAN-SIT.... i can't find the description of it.... it was used in such sentence : "little attention has been given to the experiences for tourists whilst intran-sit"
    thank u very much :)


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: Intran-sit

    Looks like a hyphenated typo.
    People who fly into one airport, but then change to another plane to continue their journey to their destination, are regarded as being 'in transit' whilst they wait around for the second plane.
    When a word comes at the end of a line, and won't quite fit, to preserve exact column width of the text, a word may be broken into two parts, indicated by the use of a hyphen. What has also happened, is that they have typed 'intransit' - and then hyphenated that.

  1. RedMtl's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #3

    Smile Re: Intran-sit

    Quote Originally Posted by ohoiinde View Post
    I would like to ask, maybe someone can explain what does it mean INTRAN-SIT.... i can't find the description of it.... it was used in such sentence : "little attention has been given to the experiences for tourists whilst intran-sit"
    thank u very much :)
    I think you have encountered a sentence which was badly divided at the end of a printed line. It makes more sense thus: "little attention has been given to the experiences for [should be "of"] tourists whilst in transit."

    The "in transit" part would mean while the tourist is travelling from point A to point B.

    Hope this helps.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Intran-sit

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Looks like a hyphenated typo.
    ...
    When a word comes at the end of a line, and won't quite fit, to preserve exact column width of the text, a word may be broken into two parts, indicated by the use of a hyphen. What has also happened, is that they have typed 'intransit' - and then hyphenated that.
    Agreed, except for the last two words. I don't think an inaccurate typist would have compounded his felony by wrongly hyphenating the new oneword. I'm afraid the word processing software applied its own hyphenating software. The hyphen in the new 'word' "intran-s*it" looks uncomfortably like the sort of rogue hyphenation typical of WinWord. I can't help applying the hyphenation rules used by OUP (based on "Hart's rules for Compositors"), which makes life with Microsoft very uncomfortable! If there were a word "intransit" the only possible place (by those rules) for a hyphen would be "in-transit".

    b

    *PS It's worse than I thought! I've now put the hyphen back in the original (lamentable) place; I first typed it in a way that I assumed WinWord would have done it (respecting the integrity of the morpheme trans).
    Last edited by BobK; 13-Apr-2008 at 16:37. Reason: Typo fixed and PS added

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