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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    to go out of one's way

    Dear teachers,

    I came across an expression which grasp my attention because of its very close sounding in my natural language.
    “to go out of one's way” = “to make a special effort to do”

    Betty went out of her way to be nice to Herb.

    I don’t mind who knows bout us. Only this woman goes out of her way to make trouble.

    In the folloing linkgo out of one's way: Information and Much More from Answers.com I saw its adequate meaning which coincides with my preliminary speculation.

    By the way I found another link go out of one's way - Definitions from Dictionary.com where you might see further information.

    Would you be kind tell me whether the expression in question is current usage in your area?

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 13-Apr-2008 at 14:45.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • UK
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      • UK

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 145
    #2

    Re: to go out of one's way

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I came across an expression which grasp my attention because of its very close sounding in my natural language.
    “to go out of one's way” = “to make a special effort to do”

    Betty went out of her way to be nice to Herb.

    I don’t mind who knows bout us. Only this woman goes out of her way to make trouble.

    In the folloing linkgo out of one's way: Information and Much More from Answers.com I saw its adequate meaning which coincides with my preliminary speculation.

    Would you be kind tell me whether the expression in question is current usage in your area?

    Thank you in advance for your effrts.

    Regards.

    V.
    Vil

    You are correct with explaination, and it is in daily usage in UK.


    Grasp = Grasped

    I am not a practicing teacher, but have TEFL qualfications and a native English speaker.

    close sounding in my natural language.

    This expression would not be used in English maybe use

    close similarity to my natural language

    Stilo

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      • United States
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      • United States

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    #3

    Re: to go out of one's way

    Yes, the definitions that you found will fit (make a special effort)

    However, there is also this situation to use that expression when talking about travel directions or position.


    Don't go out of your way to pick me up. (Means: no need to drive across town or leave your regular route to pick me up. This sentence could mean both your definition and a travel direction definition)

    That store is out of our way. (not on the same roads as the ones we will travel)

    Get out of my way. (get away from me; do not meddle in my affairs)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #4

    Re: to go out of one's way

    Hi Stilo,

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Thank you also for your relevant remarks and emendations.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you similar rectifying remarks.

    Regards.

    V.

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