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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Why the comma?

    "He turned in a magnificent performance, outclassing Davies."


    Why is there a comma after 'performance'?

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    #2

    Re: cm89bx

    Quite simply: it's a pause! (allowing a clause)

    Without it, the writer may have been forced to write:

    "He turned in a magnificent performance. His efforts were so great that they were continuously outclassing even those of Davies."


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    #3

    Re: cm89bx

    Thanks (and sorry about the thread title, by the way). However, I am still confused, as I would simply (and I mean that literally) write: "He turned in a magnificent performance outclassing Davies."

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    #4

    Re: cm89bx

    No, the comma is needed. I THINK it is a participial phrase acting as an adjective.

    It could be written "He turned in a magnificent, outclassing Davies, performance.

    But is is better as "He turned in a magnificent performance, outclassing Davies."

    (I am not a teacher. There will be others who will give you a better answer.)

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Why the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by battleground View Post
    Thanks (and sorry about the thread title, by the way). However, I am still confused, as I would simply (and I mean that literally) write: "He turned in a magnificent performance outclassing Davies."
    Then you would be wrong. The sentence is complete as:
    He turned in a magnificent performance
    Then we pause before adding additional information:
    outclassing Davies.
    The performance was magnifcant, and it outclassed that of Davies.

    ~R

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