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    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #1

    L/c

    Hello. I would like to ask native speakers of English the following, which is a part of Letter of Credit from a training text of business English, I don’t know whether is written by a native speaker or Japanese.

    Documents Required
    * Full set of clean on Board ocean Bills of Lading made out to order and endorsed in blank marked Freight Prepaid and notify party Applicant.

    First, what would you think of the part * ?

    I think it is ungrammatical. It should be “Full set of clean on Board ocean Bills of Lading made out to order, endorsed in blank, and marked Freight Prepaid and notify party Applicant.”

    Don’t you think the one I changed is correct? If the original is correct too, I would like to know the difference between the original and mine.

    Thank you very much.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: L/c

    Full set of clean on-board Ocean Bill of Lading

    The bill of lading is a document relating to the contract of carriage between shipper and ship owner.

    A "clean" bill of lading is one in which no notation is shown on the document relating to cargo having been received by the line or shipped in any other than good condition and correct quantity. Thus, standard printed bills of lading usually bear the wording "Shipped (or received for shipment) in apparent good order and condition". If no clause to the contrary is entered, the bills are said to be clean. In the case where the cargo is noted to be wet, damaged or otherwise in doubtful condition or quantity, bills of lading will be issued "claused" (or "dirty"), showing the defect in the cargo.


    So:
    Full set of clean on-board Ocean Bills of Lading made out to order and endorsed blank marked

    In this instance, the shipper must stamp and sign the bill of lading in order for title to the goods to be transferred to the consignee. Thus the bill of lading is useless to the consignee without this endorsement. This is a useful safeguard against bills being accidentally transmitted to buyers directly. Clearly, should this happen the buyer would not be able to take delivery of the goods and the bill of lading would have to be returned to the shipper for endorsement and presentation to the bank. Bills of lading completed in this manner are also said to be "To order blank endorsed".

    So: it should be:
    Full set of clean on-board Ocean Bills of Lading made out to order blank endorsed,

    marked Freight Prepaid, and notify party Applicant.: unsure here just who needs to be notified!
    Last edited by David L.; 14-Apr-2008 at 07:09.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #3

    Re: L/c

    Thank you very much, David L. I understand the part “Full set of clean on Board ocean Bills of Lading.” I think that Bills of Lading is modified by the three past participles namely made, endorsed and marked. So I think it should be written as I changed above. Because it is on the list of the Documents Required as * Packing List in triplicate showing weights and measurements. They are written as a noun plus participle(s). Marked is a past participle, isn’t it?
    I think it is almost the same as “Full set of clean on Board ocean Bills of Lading which was/ are made out to order, endorsed in blank, and marked Freight Prepaid and notify party Applicant.”
    I think both “Freight (which is/was) Prepaid” and “notify party Applicant” are the complements of the past participle marked and noun phrases. Incorrect?


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: L/c

    Grammar is not the immediate concern since this is highly esoteric writing! How something can be both 'blank' and 'marked' and 'endorsed' had me scratching my head till I sought clarification. I think you need to be sure of the correct lingo to be used, not trying to figure it out and piece it together in terms of the principles of English grammar! That's why I quoted the passages I did, to show this is how it is officially expressed, rather than I as a native speaker automatically knew the correct wording.


    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 319
    #5

    Re: L/c

    Thank you very much, David.
    I also think I need to be sure of the correct lingo to be used. But to tell the others the requirements correctly, shouldn’t they be written with the correct grammar, which I, a non native speaker of English, rely on? Please understand that my purpose of figuring them out is to understand them correctly and write the similar sentence and/or wording by myself. If I keep saying they are written in esoteric English, “I” cannot get how to write them correctly and cannot realize whether I make a mistake or not. So, English grammar is also an immediate concern. I have a policy as an over-ten year English learner that even if sentences I make sound unnatural, I can tell others what I want to say correctly. I appreciate your understanding.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: L/c

    Please understand that my purpose of figuring them out is to understand them correctly and write the similar sentence and/or wording by myself.

    That is precisely why I quoted chunks of information explaining what these terms mean.
    The grammar in this type of writing comes AFTER you get the correct wording!
    I for one do not understand the wording, or intended meaning of 'marked Freight Prepaid, and notify party Applicant.' Grammar is not going to correct the meaning of this, only impose the meaning that YOU give it, which may be at variance with the terminology these shippers use.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #7

    Re: L/c

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Please understand that my purpose of figuring them out is to understand them correctly and write the similar sentence and/or wording by myself.

    That is precisely why I quoted chunks of information explaining what these terms mean.
    The grammar in this type of writing comes AFTER you get the correct wording!
    I for one do not understand the wording, or intended meaning of 'marked Freight Prepaid, and notify party Applicant.' Grammar is not going to correct the meaning of this, only impose the meaning that YOU give it, which may be at variance with the terminology these shippers use.

    "...endorsed in the blank marked [captioned] Freight Prepaid, and notify [the] party Applicant [the organisation requesting action]"

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