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    #1

    place, daytime and over

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    Could you please explain if there is any difference between "at the same place" and "in the same place"? To me the former is more accurate, for example, at a cinema or at a bar while the latter is more broad, for example in a city etc. Is that right?

    No.2
    Why are the lights on in broad daylight?
    Can I replace " broad daylight " with "the daytime"?
    And can I replace "broad daylight" with "daylight"?

    No.3
    I can say "to get on with something" . I can also say "to get on with ironing". Can I say "to get on ironing"?




    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 14-Apr-2008 at 12:14.

  1. heidita's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: place, daytime and over

    Hi Jian, yes in broad daylight is equivalent to "during the day", it is more emphatic though.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: place, daytime and over

    You're looking at words and phrases in isolation. You MUST look at these in some context, as this is what gives the phrase its particular meaning.

    I've left my coat in the cinema.
    I first met her at the Roxy cinema.

    Let's meet in the bar after work.
    He works in a bar.
    He was standing at the bar, waiting to be served.

    "broad daylight' is a common expression and is used to emphasize that this was a surprise, or unexpected for the very fact that it was during the day (as opposed to a robbery under cover of night).
    I was robbed on a city street in broad daylight.
    Hence: 'I was robbed on a city street in daylight' removes the element of total unexpectedness, and it becomes a bald statement - it was during the day
    She leaves her children alone during the daytime.

    'ironing' :
    Forms of the sentence are:
    "I'd better get on with the ironing - get it over and done with."
    "I'd better get on with ironing that shirt while he's still in the shower."
    "I'd better get on and iron that shirt - it won't iron itself."
    Last edited by David L.; 14-Apr-2008 at 12:43.

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    #4

    Re: place, daytime and over

    &
    Dear David,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I am so glad you point out there is something wrong with the way I look at words. I shall try to avoid doing so next time.

    I understand all of your explanations except No.1.
    Possibly it is because I didn't express my ideas clearly I am afraid I had to ask you No.1 again.

    I understand your examples in No.1. You used 'cinema' and "bar" as examples. Can I use it as a rule? I mean can "at" collocate with "place"? For in most cases we can only say "in this place" or "in that place". Could you please explain under what condition I can use "at this place"? Is it if the place belongs to certain people say a Mr.Black then I can say "at Mr.Black's place"?
    I hope I can explain my meaning clearer.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    You're looking at words and phrases in isolation. You MUST look at these in some context, as this is what gives the phrase its particular meaning.

    I've left my coat in the cinema.
    I first met her at the Roxy cinema.

    Let's meet in the bar after work.
    He works in a bar.
    He was standing at the bar, waiting to be served.

    "broad daylight' is a common expression and is used to emphasize that this was a surprise, or unexpected for the very fact that it was during the day (as opposed to a robbery under cover of night).
    I was robbed on a city street in broad daylight.
    Hence: 'I was robbed on a city street in daylight' removes the element of total unexpectedness, and it becomes a bald statement - it was during the day
    She leaves her children alone during the daytime.

    'ironing' :
    Forms of the sentence are:
    "I'd better get on with the ironing - get it over and done with."
    "I'd better get on with ironing that shirt while he's still in the shower."
    "I'd better get on and iron that shirt - it won't iron itself."

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