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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    immerse/immerge

    Can you say:

    Being captivated by it, I immersed myself in/into (is into correct?) the book.
    (I was absorbed by it, I liked it so much that I read it all day and forgot about everything else, etc)

    What is the meaning of immerge? The forum even underlines it with red as I write it. I found the word here: immerge - Definitions from Dictionary.com
    Is it an archaic word, or maybe there is another explanation to it?

    Thank you in advance for your answers.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: immerse/immerge

    Quote Originally Posted by Mihai_alexandru View Post
    Can you say:

    Being captivated by it, I immersed myself in/into (is into correct?) the book.
    (I was absorbed by it, I liked it so much that I read it all day and forgot about everything else, etc)

    I immersed myself in my book

    What is the meaning of immerge? The forum even underlines it with red as I write it. I found the word here: immerge - Definitions from Dictionary.com
    Is it an archaic word, or maybe there is another explanation to it?

    Archaic. If you used it, you will not be understood. Sorry!

    Thank you in advance for your answers.
    .


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 89
    #3

    Re: immerse/immerge

    But can I use the other meaning of the verb "immerge" as to disappear from view?

    She immerged the vegetables in water.

    Also, can we use the preposition "into" with "immerse"?

    I immersed myself into the book.

    This is probably wrong but are there any other possible uses of the verb "immerse" or "immerge" with the preposition "into"?

    Please explain as I would like to understand this issue.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: immerse/immerge

    Quote Originally Posted by Mihai_alexandru View Post
    But can I use the other meaning of the verb "immerge" as to disappear from view?

    She immerged the vegetables in water. You could - but would find people look at you oddly.

    Also, can we use the preposition "into" with "immerse"? No. You can immerse yourself within a play, a book, an activity.

    I immersed myself into the book.

    This is probably wrong but are there any other possible uses of the verb "immerse" or "immerge" with the preposition "into"? Not that I know of.

    Please explain as I would like to understand this issue.
    .


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 89
    #5

    Re: immerse/immerge

    "She immerged the vegetables in water. You could - but would find people look at you oddly."

    Why is that? Dictionary.com says that "to emmerge" means:
    1.to plunge, as into a fluid. 2.to disappear by entering into any medium, as the moon into the shadow of the sun.
    and it has the archaic meaning of "to immerse", as to be absorbed by something.
    So what's wrong with my sentence? I meant to put the vegetables in water, as to sink them in water, like cleaning them in order to prepare food. Can I use it with this meaning, or is it also considered an archaic word?

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    #6

    Re: immerse/immerge

    Hi all

    Mihai_alexandru,

    Archaic usage: We took . . . lukewarm water, and in it immerged a quantity of the leaves of senna. --Boyle.

    Modern usage, to disappear in e.g., liquid, but not to have one's vegetables disappear in water; i.e., lose one's vegetable in water. Which is why your example sentence sounds kind of strange. It was a good try though.


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    #7

    Re: immerse/immerge

    Hi Mihai_alexandru,


    I hope my post will provoke the honored NES’ into thinking more liberal and open-minded. What for one routine? Archaic words? Antiquated words? Old-fashioned words? Stop that nonsense!


    immerge (v) = to submerge or disappear in or as if in a liquid.


    immerge (v) = To sink below the surface of a liquid; to completely delve into a subject.

    After you "emerge" (to become visible; to become apparent) from the locker room you might "immerge" (to plunge) into a swimming pool.

    In accordance with you “emerge” is a contemporary word and “immerge” is an archaic word, isn’t it? Suff and nonsense!

    immerge: Definition, Synonyms and Much More from Answers.com

    Regards.

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #8

    Re: immerse/immerge

    Hi Vil - if you can give textual references to current usages of "immerge", then maybe the archaic tag can be abandoned.

    Neither the British Corpus nor the American Corpus contain it.

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