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    #1

    honour

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    No.1
    Please read the sentence:

    Of course we're putting you and Dad on your honour. I have consulted the dictionary:

    on your honour: If you are on your honour to do something, you have made a promise to act as you have said you will.

    Could you please explain if "put somebody on your honour" a phrase?

    No.2
    I get confused by "live " and "living". The following is from my dictionary:
    live: having life, not dead, e.g.
    You won't see live animals in a museum.
    living: alive
    Both animals and plants are living things.

    My question is: Can "live" in the first sentence be replaced by "living" and can "living " in the second sentence replaced by "live"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

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    #2

    Re: honour

    Hi jiang

    No.1
    To put/place someone on their honour is another way of saying that you trust them to be honorable.


    No.2a
    ...live animals in a museum.
    ...living animals in a museum.

    The semantics here are OK, but there isn't a collocation living animals, so most speakers would opt for the structures live animals or animals living.

    No.2b
    Both animals and plants are living things.
    => things that are living

    Both aninals and plants are live things.
    => things that are alive

    Again, the semantics are OK, jiang, but the collocation for that particular context is living things. Cf. Electrical wires are live things.


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    #3

    Re: honour

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.1.

    I don't mean to offend you but I am afraid I still have problems with No.2. The following sentences, which confuse me and made me ask you the questions, are from my textbook:

    1. Scientists have made several experiments with live/living mice.
    2. The blue whale is the largest living animal.

    Could you please kindly explain if there is any wrong with my textbook as some teachers have pointed out?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang




    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi jiang

    No.1
    To put/place someone on their honour is another way of saying that you trust them to be honorable.


    No.2a
    ...live animals in a museum.
    ...living animals in a museum.

    The semantics here are OK, but there isn't a collocation living animals, so most speakers would opt for the structures live animals or animals living.

    No.2b
    Both animals and plants are living things.
    => things that are living

    Both aninals and plants are live things.
    => things that are alive

    Again, the semantics are OK, jiang, but the collocation for that particular context is living things. Cf. Electrical wires are live things.


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    #4

    Re: honour

    Hi

    Well, here's how I would say these sentences:

    1. Scientists have made several experiments with live mice.

    Another way of saying this would be, scientists experimented on mice that were alive, not dead.



    2. The blue whale is the largest living animal.

    Another way to say this would be, the blue whale is the largest animal still living today. That is, it is not extinct.


    This should help some:

    The opposite of living is extinct.
    The opposite of live is dead.


    By the way, what did the teacher point out that was wrong?


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    #5

    Re: honour

    Hi,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand them all.
    I am not whether I understand your question "By the way, what did the teacher point out that was wrong? " or not. Maybe you mean according to my teacher which is wrong? If it is, I should say my teacher didn't say the sentences are wrong. The fact is I don't understand the difference.
    But my teacher said both "live" and "living" can be used in the sentence "Scientists have made several experiments with live/living mice". According to your explanation only "live" is correct while "living'' should be wrong.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi

    Well, here's how I would say these sentences:

    1. Scientists have made several experiments with live mice.

    Another way of saying this would be, scientists experimented on mice that were alive, not dead.



    2. The blue whale is the largest living animal.

    Another way to say this would be, the blue whale is the largest animal still living today. That is, it is not extinct.


    This should help some:

    The opposite of living is extinct.
    The opposite of live is dead.


    By the way, what did the teacher point out that was wrong?

    Last edited by jiang; 16-Apr-2008 at 13:10.

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    #6

    Re: honour

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    But my teacher said both "live" and "living" can be used in the sentence "Scientists have made several experiments with live/living mice". According to your explanation only "live" is correct while "living'' should be wrong.
    Right. You have it. If extinct is the opposite of living, then using living in the sentence below expresses the wrong meaning:

    Ex: Scientists have made serveral experiments with living mice. [as opposed to extinct mice?]

    Ex: Scientists have conducted serveral experiments using live mice. [as opposed to dead mice]

    Note the collocation above, conducted ... experiments, not made experiments. Also, using live mice is a more exact way of saying with live mice.


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    #7

    Re: honour


    Hi,
    Thank you so much for your help and patience. I am glad I got it.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Right. You have it. If extinct is the opposite of living, then using living in the sentence below expresses the wrong meaning:

    Ex: Scientists have made serveral experiments with living mice. [as opposed to extinct mice?]

    Ex: Scientists have conducted serveral experiments using live mice. [as opposed to dead mice]

    Note the collocation above, conducted ... experiments, not made experiments. Also, using live mice is a more exact way of saying with live mice.


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