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  1. Banned
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    #1

    is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    Hi,
    my little sister wanted to learn some English. We went to a book store nearby. Randomly, I picked up an English book. While scanning its tutorials, I found this example sentence which made me confused:
    Tom has more apples than David.
    Well, it seemed to me that the author is trying to compare the number of apples to a person (David) rather than the number of apples that David has.

    Any ideas?
    Last edited by kwfine; 16-Apr-2008 at 16:49.

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    #2

    Arrow Re: is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    The sentence is OK as it is. In this sentence what is actually being compared is the number of apples Tom and David have. The sentence should read: Tom has more apples than "Davids" (using the plural of the personal noun David) to match your interpretation (the author is trying to compare the number of apples to a person (David) rather than the number of apples that David has)

    I hope this helps you. Do not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions.


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    #3

    Re: is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by hello_there View Post
    The sentence is OK as it is. The sentence should read: Tom has more apples than "Davids" (using the plural of the personal noun David)
    Yes, as hello_there says, the sentence in the book is OK as it is. But your question isn't very clear kwfine. Anyway, what it means is that David has a certain amount of apples but Tom has more. So if David has, say, five apples, Tom has five + one or two or three or more.

    hello_there, the underlined explanation above isn't in fact quite right: what's happening here is that the verb has been left out (which is perfectly okay); but if it were inserted, it would be: Tom has more apples than David has. So in fact it wouldn't be appropriate to add an s plural or even an apostrophe s.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    If I may, what hello_there was trying to do was to show how the sentence would have to read if the writer were trying to compare the number of apples in Tom's possession with the number of "Davids" in Tom's possession. (If Appley can make a "Lisa" perhaps it can make a "David" as well.)

    That rewrite was correct if # of apples > # of Davids had been the intent of the sentence.

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    #5

    Re: is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    Yes, as hello_there says, the sentence in the book is OK as it is. But your question isn't very clear kwfine. Anyway, what it means is that David has a certain amount of apples but Tom has more. So if David has, say, five apples, Tom has five + one or two or three or more.

    hello_there, the underlined explanation above isn't in fact quite right: what's happening here is that the verb has been left out (which is perfectly okay); but if it were inserted, it would be: Tom has more apples than David has. So in fact it wouldn't be appropriate to add an s plural or even an apostrophe s.
    To hello_there, naomimalan, Barb_D,
    Many thanks to you!

    I would like to ask if these sentences are talking about the same thing:
    Tom has more apples than David.
    Tom has more apples than David's.
    Tom has more apples than David does.
    Last edited by kwfine; 18-Apr-2008 at 06:18.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: is there any mistake in the example sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by kwfine View Post
    I would like to ask if there sentences are talking about the same thing:
    1. Tom has more apples than David.
    2. Tom has more apples than David's.
    3. Tom has more apples than David does.
    1. Yes. The impication is "than David does."

    2. No. Tom's collection of apples is larger than David's woudl be okay.

    3. Yes, as stated above.

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