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    #1

    Grammar

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    No.1
    I get confused by "as " as a relative pron and "as" as conjuction of method. Please read the following sentences:

    1. He is absent, as is often the case. According to my grammar book this is a relative pron. "as" is the predicate.

    2. She is unusually tall as are both her parents. According to my grammar book this is conjunction of method. I think ''as'' is also a predicate here.

    And I don't understand "just as " . Does it mean when ''as'' is used as a conjuction it can be used with "just". It can also be used without 'just'? For example in my second sentence can I add ''just'' in front of ''as''?


    The following two sentences are from a play.

    No.1
    It's mother's first husband come back alive. My question is why there are two verbs here "is" and "come'?

    No.2
    (context: the men are quarreling and going to fight)
    Thelma: (who has been listening offstage, darts over and gets poker, which she holds out to Mr. Kent) Land him one with this, sir!
    My question is: what does "one" refer to?
    No.3


    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


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    #2

    Re: Grammar

    No.1
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.

    My question is why there are two verbs here "is" and "come'?
    It is a shortened version of:
    It's mother's first husband. He has come back alive.
    It's mother's first husband, who has come back alive.
    Hence:
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.

    No.2
    (context: the men are quarreling and going to fight)
    Thelma: (who has been listening offstage, darts over and gets poker, which she holds out to Mr. Kent) Land him one with this, sir!
    My question is: what does "one" refer to?
    A blow on the head or his body with the poker, as indicated by handing of the poker to him, and the word 'landing' = inflict a blow to someone.

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    #3

    Re: Grammar

    Hi all

    No.1
    Pronoun test: replace as with which:
    1. He is absent, as /which is often the case.

    Conjuction test: replace as with (just) like or just as:
    2. She is unusually tall (just) as are / (just) like both her parents.

    No.1
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.
    Its mother's first husband came back alive.

    Its is a possessive pronoun, and the verb is came back.

    No.2
    I agree with David here, Land him one/a blow with this, sir!


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    #4

    Re: Grammar

    Dear David,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    No.1
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.

    My question is why there are two verbs here "is" and "come'?
    It is a shortened version of:
    It's mother's first husband. He has come back alive.
    It's mother's first husband, who has come back alive.
    Hence:
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.

    No.2
    (context: the men are quarreling and going to fight)
    Thelma: (who has been listening offstage, darts over and gets poker, which she holds out to Mr. Kent) Land him one with this, sir!
    My question is: what does "one" refer to?
    A blow on the head or his body with the poker, as indicated by handing of the poker to him, and the word 'landing' = inflict a blow to someone.

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    #5

    Re: Grammar

    Hi,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.


    No.1
    I think I understand the second example but fail to understand the first example.
    In sentence two I can't use "which" to replace because that means "Her parents are also unusually tall". Is that right?

    I interpret "(just) as" "equal". So in sentence one "He is absent" equals "the case". And it can be replace by "which". It can't be replace by "just as" because in that case the clause has no subject. But since "just" can be omitted then I can use "as" and this makes it possible for "as" to function as a subject.
    I know there must be something wrong with my thinking so but I myself cannot analyze it. Could you please kindly explain what's wrong with it?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi all

    No.1
    Pronoun test: replace as with which:
    1. He is absent, as /which is often the case.

    Conjuction test: replace as with (just) like or just as:
    2. She is unusually tall (just) as are / (just) like both her parents.

    No.1
    It's mother's first husband come back alive.
    Its mother's first husband came back alive.

    Its is a possessive pronoun, and the verb is came back.

    No.2
    I agree with David here, Land him one/a blow with this, sir!


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    #6

    Re: Grammar

    Hi

    No.1 [I've changed the sentences to make it easier]
    1. He is absent, as is often the case.
    2. She is unusually tall as is her mother.

    In 2. as bridges a comparison (just like you said). The same comparison doesn't work for 1.

    1. He is absent, just like is often the case.

    Note, "He is absent" doesn't equal "the case". On the contrary, in 1. as functions as a pronoun, not as a conjunction, so it can't mean 'equals'.


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    #7

    Re: Grammar

    Hi,

    I should use "Dear ...." but your pen name is somewhat unusual so I simply use "Hi" to greet you. Please do not think this is impolite.


    Thank you very much for your futher explanation and your patience. I understand it now. I am going to do more exercises on this and I hope I can solve problems using your theory.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi

    No.1 [I've changed the sentences to make it easier]
    1. He is absent, as is often the case.
    2. She is unusually tall as is her mother.

    In 2. as bridges a comparison (just like you said). The same comparison doesn't work for 1.

    1. He is absent, just like is often the case.

    Note, "He is absent" doesn't equal "the case". On the contrary, in 1. as functions as a pronoun, not as a conjunction, so it can't mean 'equals'.


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    #8

    Re: Grammar

    No worries. Using "Hi" is OK. In fact, it's very common, so please feel free to start using it in your messages.

    These exercises may help:
    As or Like - Online Language Quiz - UsingEnglish.com
    As or like?


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    #9

    Re: Grammar

    Dear Soup,

    I used to think it was polite to greet people whom I think are teachers by "Hi". Now I know I can do so without offending them.

    Do you mean you are easy to get along with so I can greet you or I can greet all the teachers in this website?

    Thank you very much for providing me with the website of exercises.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    No worries. Using "Hi" is OK. In fact, it's very common, so please feel free to start using it in your messages.

    These exercises may help:
    As or Like - Online Language Quiz - UsingEnglish.com
    As or like?


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    #10

    Re: Grammar

    Jiang, in North America it's acceptable to say or write "Hi" to greet people with whom you are familiar.

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