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    #1

    follow suit

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough explain to me the sameness of the following two sentences?

    • As soon as he left the room I did the same.

    • As soon as he left the room I followed suit.

    I know that the meaning of the expression “follow suit” is “imitate or do as someone else has done” but I couldn’t expound it myself.

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: follow suit

    Vil, it seems like you're using it just fine.
    As soon as he left the rooom, I left the room.
    He left the room, and I followed suit.

    Do you know how to play bridge? If a club is led, you must play a club if you have one - you must "follow suit" and do as that person has done.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 18-Apr-2008 at 22:02.

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    #3

    Re: follow suit

    Hi Barb_D,

    Thank God. In the present case the word “suit” has nothing to do with “courting”, “love-making”, “lawsuit” etc. Much to my regret I don’t play bridge but I made the sense of your explanation.

    Thank you for your kindness.

    Regards.

    V.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: follow suit

    You're very welcome.

    I don't play bridge, but I know the rules. (I like to play spades, which is bridge without all the hard rules.) Many card games require you to "follow suit" if you are able. (The four suits are clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades, if you haven't already learned them in English.)

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    #5

    Re: follow suit

    Hi Barb_D,

    I thought I was a knowledgeable person but it turn out that my knowledge concerning the card games is confined within limits including only the Tchaikovsky’s Pique Dame (The Queen of Spade or Pikvaya Dama).

    Thank you for your brief introduction in the card’s world.

    Regards.

    V.

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