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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    think of vs think about

    hi there,
    what's the difference between these expressions, please?
    I think of you.
    I think about you.
    I dream of Genny.
    I dream about Genny.
    thanks.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: think of vs think about

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi there,
    what's the difference between these expressions, please?
    I think of you.
    I think about you.
    I dream of Genny.
    I dream about Genny.
    thanks.
    'of' is less involved, the thoughts could be fleeting whereas 'about' signals that the subject spends more time, the thoughts are longer and more involved.

  2. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #3

    Re: think of vs think about

    thanks.
    so, they have basically the same meaning except for how deep or how shallow the thought/dream is?
    if I address a beloved person, "about" would be more appropriated, please?
    thanks.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #4

    Re: think of vs think about

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    thanks.
    so, they have basically the same meaning except for how deep or how shallow the thought/dream is?
    if I address a beloved person, "about" would be more appropriate[d], would it? [please]
    thanks.
    It depends on who the beloved person is and how much you want to reveal, JC.

    If it's a potential girlfriend and the relationship is quite new, you might frighten some by telling them you think about them often. Or it might move the relationship on to a new level much quicker.

    If it's a close relative, then it probably isn't so crucial. Like all language, what one intends may not always be what the other understands.

    Ciao.

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