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  1. proof.beh's Avatar

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,814
    #1

    Prowess

    Hi!

    What kind of sentence in English does the following sentence notify?

    "Having said that, before you get jealous of my prowess, you are missing the most inmportant part of this story!"

    And what does it mean?

    Thank you


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 36
    #2

    Re: Help

    Quote Originally Posted by proof.beh View Post
    Hi!

    What kind of sentence in English does the following sentence notify?

    "Having said that, before you get jealous of my prowess, you are missing the most inmportant part of this story!"

    And what does it mean?

    Thank you
    I'm not sure I understand your question and what you mean by "notify," but I'll try to help to explain the meaning of the sentence.

    "Having said that" - refers to what was said prior to this sentence. Another way of saying this would be, "Now that I (we, you) have said that"

    It would seem that whatever was said in the sentence before this passage made some reference to the speaker's prowess - (see the following definition from dictionary.com - I like definition #2)

    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source - Share This prow·ess Audio Help /ˈpraʊɪs/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[prou-is] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation –noun 1.exceptional valor, bravery, or ability, esp. in combat or battle. 2.exceptional or superior ability, skill, or strength: his prowess as a public speaker. 3.a valiant or daring deed.

    Then, it seems that the speaker wants the listener to ignore whatever reference there was to his or her prowess so that the listener can focus on the most important part of the story -- which has not yet been revealed.

    Please let me know if I can clarify further.
    Last edited by AntieAnnie; 24-Apr-2008 at 23:43. Reason: to add space after the dictionary.com entry

  2. proof.beh's Avatar

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,814
    #3

    Re: Help

    Quote Originally Posted by AntieAnnie View Post
    I'm not sure I understand your question and what you mean by "notify," but I'll try to help to explain the meaning of the sentence.

    "Having said that" - refers to what was said prior to this sentence. Another way of saying this would be, "Now that I (we, you) have said that"

    It would seem that whatever was said in the sentence before this passage made some reference to the speaker's prowess - (see the following definition from dictionary.com - I like definition #2)

    Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source - Share This prow·ess Audio Help /ˈpraʊɪs/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[prou-is] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation –noun 1.exceptional valor, bravery, or ability, esp. in combat or battle. 2.exceptional or superior ability, skill, or strength: his prowess as a public speaker. 3.a valiant or daring deed.

    Then, it seems that the speaker wants the listener to ignore whatever reference there was to his or her prowess so that the listener can focus on the most important part of the story -- which has not yet been revealed.

    Please let me know if I can clarify further.
    Hi!

    I meant What kind of sentence is that? From structural point of view!

    If you just have more points, please say!

    Thank you very much!

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