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    #1

    'beg to differ'

    When one 'begs to differ', does it mean they ask humbly to oppose? Please, somebody help, and I could perhaps use some examples too

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    #2

    Smile Re: 'beg to differ'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    When one 'begs to differ', does it mean they ask humbly to oppose? Please, somebody help, and I could perhaps use some examples too
    To "beg to differ" is an expression sometimes used in a disagreement where the parties are being falsely polite toward each other. It is similar to the term "with respect" which might precede or follow a statement which carries no respect at all.

    It has nothing to do with "begging" for anything.

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    #3

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    I beg to differ/disagree - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    "I beg to differ" is certainly more polite than many other ways of expressing disagreement. It is a way for a person to say that he/she has a contrary opinion (to that of somebody else) about something.


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    #4

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    When one 'begs to differ', does it mean they ask humbly to oppose? Please, somebody help, and I could perhaps use some examples too
    In fact, in its origins, it does mean to ask humbly to oppose but I agree with Ronbee when he says that it is a polite way for a person to say that he/she has a contrary opinion about something.

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    #5

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    In fact, in its origins, it does mean to ask humbly to oppose but I agree with Ronbee when he says that it is a polite way for a person to say that he/she has a contrary opinion about something.
    For example, in Nefertiti's Here Comes The Sun thread, I could have said 'I beg to differ with Anglika'. Instead, I used the shorthand 'IMHO' - hoping to answer, by implication, a previous question (I don't know whose) about the meaning of 'IMO'.

    b

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    #6

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    What about 'I venture to doubt' (which seems to be similar to 'I beg to differ')? I heard this expression from a native speaker.
    Is it common? If so, colloquial or formal?

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    #7

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    It's not a standard collocation to me. In fact, it sounds a bit like someone trying to 'lard' their speech a bit to sound more formal.


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    #8

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    I think it is possible to say 'with all respect'.

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    #9

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    Quote Originally Posted by tupolevrocker View Post
    I think it is possible to say 'with all respect'.
    And you can add "due" before "respect".

    Re "venture to doubt" - I think I've heard the collocation, but it's not strong; a much stronger one with 'venture to...' is 'suggest' - especially in the (polite) conditional: 'What you've written has its merits, but I would venture to suggest that you could profitably spend some more time on this essay before you submit it finally'.

    b

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    #10

    Re: 'beg to differ'

    Phew - I hadn't done my homework before my last post, but BNC has these hits:

    1 VENTURE TO SUGGEST 9
    2 VENTURE TO BE 8
    3 VENTURE TO THINK 7
    4 VENTURE TO ASK 6
    5 VENTURE TO ADD 5
    6 VENTURE TO SAY 5
    7 VENTURE TO MAKE 3
    8 VENTURE TO MARKET 3
    9 VENTURE TO DOUBT 3

    (go to [Davies/BYU] BYU-BNC: British National Corpus and search for this string:

    venture to [v*]

    There are plenty of weaker collocations.



    b

    PS 8 is a red herring (=misleading instance). Although 'market' can be a verb, in the collocation 'venture to market' it is a noun.
    Last edited by BobK; 27-Apr-2008 at 18:15. Reason: Added last line, and PS

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