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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    kimberly

    in this sentence: How many are left? what part of speech is left?

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    #2

    Smile Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    in this sentence: How many are left? what part of speech is left?
    It's an adjective.



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    #3

    Re: kimberly

    leave: verb
    Now I leave,
    Yesterday I left
    I have left

    be left: remain to be used or dealt with.; a part or effect of something stays after it has gone or been used.
    There's some food left over from the party.
    His shoes left muddy marks on the floor.
    "Are you leaving any for me? Will there be any left over?"
    It's a verb.
    Last edited by David L.; 01-May-2008 at 01:54.

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    #4

    Cool Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    leave: verb
    Now I leave,
    Yesterday I left
    I have left

    be left: remain to be used or dealt with.; a part or effect of something stays after it has gone or been used.
    There's some food left over from the party.
    His shoes left muddy marks on the floor.
    "Are you leaving any for me? Will there be any left over?"
    It's a verb.
    How come, David?
    It's impossible to treat left as a verb in the sense of something being remaining:

    There's some food left (over) from the party. (predicative adjective)
    There's some left-over food from the party. (attributive adjective)
    or
    There's some left-overs from the party. (noun; there's + plural noun = non-standard)


    However, it is a verb (past participle) in the passive construction, but of a different meaning than that of be left (over):

    His shoes left muddy marks on the floor. (active)
    Muddy marks were left (by his shoes) on the floor. (passive)

    Obviously, you can't use left over here.


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    #5

    Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    How come, David?
    It could also be part of a Present tense passive verb,
    since in English the passive voice is periphrastic and does not have a one-word form,but consists of a form of the auxiliary verb be together with a verb's past participle.

    Even if you insisted it wasn't , this wouldn't make "left" an adjective,since it's a past participle.


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    #6

    Cool Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    It could also be part of a Present tense passive verb,
    since in English the passive voice is periphrastic and does not have a one-word form,but consists of a form of the auxiliary verb be together with a verb's past participle.
    I mentioned the same thing in my previous post.

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    Even if you insisted it wasn't , this wouldn't make "left" an adjective,since it's a past participle.
    As far as I know, most past participles can be used adjectively.

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    #7

    Re: kimberly

    If something is left (i.e. left behind) is a past participle of the verb to leave, used passively ("been leaved"). It is only an adjective if it is used in direct conjunction with a noun, meaning left-hand (e.g. my left foot).

    It is similar to the word broken - past part. verb: My leg was broken by another player. Adj: The doctor asked me about my broken leg.

    That's my opinion - hope it helps.

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    #8

    Smile Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post
    It is similar to the word broken - past part. verb: My leg was broken by another player. Adj: The doctor asked me about my broken leg.
    Spot-on, Dave. But you failed to mention the predicative adjective broken:

    My leg has been broken (passive) by another player, so now it is broken (predicative adjective - surely not passive).


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    #9

    Re: kimberly

    Maybe we should have another look at what kimberly actually wanted to know

    How many are left? what part of speech is left?

    to my mind, and according to both TOPG Advanced / AGIU within this sentence "left" is part of a verb

    it would , however , have to be considered an adjective when used like in this way

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    #10

    Re: kimberly

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    My leg has been broken (passive) by another player, so now it is broken (predicative adjective - surely not passive).
    I'm sorry it's again a past participle and not an adjective.

    Last edited by beascarpetta; 01-May-2008 at 12:35.

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