Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia

    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,247
    #1

    sprawl

    Hello,

    Would you please tell me how you would explain the verb "sprawling out" in this context? The definition I have found in the dictionary doesn't match.

    "Quite an ovation," she cried, sprawling out of her first-class carriage. "They'll take us for royalty. Oh, Mr. Kingcroft, get us foot-warmers." E.M. Forster

    All the best

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: sprawl

    Hi hela

    She exited the carriage with all four limbs spread out carelessly or ungracefully; to do something in an unnatural or ungraceful manner.


    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: sprawl

    Hi Hela,

    sprawl (v) = to sit or lie with the body and limbs spread out awkwardly.
    sprawl = stretch, draw out, lie prone, prostrate

    About four stops later, the bus has emptied somewhat, and he shifts to an empty row of seats, sprawling out across them, with his leg blocking the aisle.
    And then she came bounding back and couldn't stop herself, went straight into Doreen, knocked Doreen off her legs completely, and she was just sprawled out on all fours, it was just hilarious, we, in fact we did an action replay on that because you had to see it again to believe it.
    Out in the corridor, Gazzer was asleep, legs sprawled out , head thrown back, mouth wide open, snoring.
    Anton lay sprawled out , his thighs still closed.
    When that happened it meant he was drunk, sprawled out on the sofa if he hadn't been able to reach the bed.

    Regards.

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 119
    #4

    Re: sprawl

    It probably means that she left the carriage in an unladylike, undignified manner, not befitting of royalty. I think it's a slightly poor choice of word by the author,as sprawl means to lie with arms and legs spread out, untidily.

    It's not a word that is usually used to describe movement, but a state of repose.

    I think the author is trying to mock her ungainliness as she says "people will think we're royalty."

    Dave

  2. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #5

    Re: sprawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post
    I think it's a slightly poor choice of word by the author, as sprawl means to lie with arms and legs spread out, untidily.
    What if the author was picturing her in a sitting position, her arms and legs outside the carriage door, sprawled outward as she exited?



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •