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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Muddah? Fadduh?

    Hi,

    Q1: Muddah =mother?
    Q2: Fadduh= father?

    Are they children's English? Thanks!

    Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh (A Letter from Camp)
    " is the Grammy-winning novelty song based on Kvetch letters Allan Sherman received from his son attending Camp Champlain, New York.[1] The song is a parody that complains about Camp Granada (e.g., "Leonard Skinner"[2] got "Ptomaine poisoning") and is set to the tune of Ponchielli's Dance of the Hours. The title is taken from the first lines:

    Hello Muddah
    Hello Fadduh
    Here I am at
    Camp Granada
    Camp is very
    entertaining
    And they say we'll have some fun if it stops raining.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Yes, it's mother and father.

    No, they are not commonly said by children, but rather as more of a regional pronunciation.

    In fact, the only time I've ever seen them written that way is in the lyrics to this song.

    Children would say "Mommy" and "Daddy" or "Mom" and "Dad." Few children would write a letter to their parents as "Hello Mother, Hello Father." They would write "Dear Mom and Dad."

    The song is a parody - and it's VERY funny when you hear it sung.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post

    Few children would write a letter to their parents as "Hello Mother, Hello Father." They would write "Dear Mom and Dad."
    Hello Barb_D,

    Thanks for your answer.

    Another questions as belows:

    #1 Why do children hardly write " Hello Mom, Hello Father"? Is " Dear" the only choice?

    #2 Is the word " Mom" always ahead of " Dad"? I ask this because in Chinese, the order of words is first "dad", then " mom".
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 02-May-2008 at 14:18. Reason: typo

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Hi Daffodils,
    Almost all letters begin with "Dear,"

    In e-mail, though, except the most formal, we tend to start with Hello or even Hi. If I were e-mailing my parents, I'd write :Hi Mom and Dad," I guess it's because e-mail feels so instant - like we're having a conversation.

    I would also send a postcard that said "Hi!"

    But I would never write a handwritten letter that started with anything other than "Dear,"

    And yes, it's almost always "Mom and Dad," to the point where "Dad and Mom" just sounds odd to my ear.

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Hello Barb_D,

    Thank you again! I'd like to write down the rules in my English learning note.

  6. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    I remember reading an article once about how Americans always tended to remember or "shout out" to their mothers rather than their fathers when they were provided a moment in the spotlight. For example, when an athlete is given one split second on camera, he'll usually yell "Hi, Mom!" Likewise, anyone in a crowd who happens to get on-camera during a TV broadcast will shout "Hi, Mom!" Part of the reasoning (from the scientific types who analyze this type of thing) was that Mother represents the warm, caring, nurturing parent, so we tend to want to acknowledge her whenever possible. Father traditionally represents the wage-earner and the disciplinarian, always somewhat stand-offish when it comes to affection. When you were naughty during the day, your mother admonished "Just wait until your father gets home!" and you then sat and dreaded your punishment. Father may have pitched the baseball with you after dinner, or helped you with your math homework, but he was never (traditionally) as warm and cuddly as Mother was.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    There are a great many pairings that have a fixed order, so that they sound off when you say them in the "wrong" order.

    Native speakers, do you agree that reversing the order on any of these would sound weird to you?

    Mom & Dad
    Salt & Pepper
    Bread & Butter
    Black & White
    Good & Bad
    Length & Width
    Height & Weight

  8. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Hi Ouisch,

    Thank you for your emotional comment. The images of mother and father are similar to traditional Chinese ones.

    Westerners always put ladies ahead of men, such as " lady first!", " ladies and gentlemen", " bride and bridegroom".

    In Chinese, the order of the words for a couple are "bridegroom and bride". We don't say " lady first" traditionally.

  9. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Hi Barb_D,

    Thank you very much for your supplement. I have noticed some different orders of the words in fixed phrases between English and Mandarin (Chinese). The phrases in blue are our fixed phrases in Mandarin if translated literally.

    fire and water --<water and fire>
    mom and dad--<dad and mom>
    rich and poor--<poor and rich>
    ...

  10. RonBee's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Muddah? Fadduh?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi Barb_D,

    Thank you very much for your supplement. I have noticed some different orders of the words in fixed phrases between English and Mandarin (Chinese). The phrases in blue are our fixed phrases in Mandarin if translated literally.

    fire and water --<water and fire>
    mom and dad--<dad and mom>
    rich and poor--<poor and rich>
    ...
    Thanks for the interesting comparisons. (Barb is right about those English phrases.)

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