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    #1

    Is this wrong?

    Hi there!

    I found the following sentence in my dictionary.

    "I persuaded him, but he woudn't do it."

    Is this okay? I think it sounds strange because "persuaded him" normally implies "he agreeded to accept what he was told".

    I'd really appreciate any advice.

    optimistic pessimist

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: Is this wrong?

    Even though I was able to persuade him to my way of thinking, I wasn't able to get him to follow through (i.e., to do the act).



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: Is this wrong?

    'persuade' is being used with the meaning = cause (someone) to believe something, esp. after a sustained effort; to convince .
    "He did everything he could to persuade the police that he was the robber, but he is known to confess to every petty crime and murder in the town."

    I agree though. It strikes one as an odd sentence since we are so used to sentences like, "he persuaded me to go", where 'he did go', that unless the preceding sentence signals that some attempt at convincing has been going on, nothing prepares you for this other meaning of 'persuade' - I know it caught me by surprise. I think the writer could have constructed a better sentence.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #4

    Re: Is this wrong?

    'persuade' is being used with the meaning = cause (someone) to believe something, esp. after a sustained effort; to convince .
    "He did everything he could to persuade the police that he was the robber, but he is known to confess to every petty crime and murder in the town."

    I agree though. It strikes one as an odd sentence since we are so used to sentences like, "he persuaded me to go"(= cause (someone) to do something through reasoning or argument) where 'he did go', that unless the preceding sentence signals that some attempt at convincing has been going on, nothing prepares you for this other meaning of 'persuade' - I know it caught me by surprise. I think the writer could have constructed a better sentence.

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