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  1. Noego's Avatar
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    #1

    Some vocab questions

    From the Catcher in the rye:

    1:

    ''It wasn't too far, but it was cold as hell, and the snow made it hard for walking, and my Gladstones kept banging hell out of my legs.''

    What are ''gladstones'' exactly? Are they some kind of winter boots?

    2: "I have this grandmother that's quite lavish with her dough."

    According to my dictionary:

    Immoderate in giving or bestowing; unstinting

    Is lavish another way of describing someone who is very generous?

    Is it pejorative, as in saying, someone who gives too much for their own good?

    3.

    "It's a long story. I don't wanna bore ya, Ackley. I'm thinking of your welfare."

    When you talk about the welfare of someone, does it emcompass both their mental and physical well-being?

    Or does it emphasize more than the other?

    Or is it more related to the context; it sometimes means your physical integrity and sometimes your happiness?

    4:

    "It just drove me stark staring mad when I thought about her and Stradlater parked somewhere in that fat-assed Ed Banky's car."

    What is the meaning of stark here?

    From my understanding, it means completely.

    In this sentence, it means it made Holden extremely angry, furious.

    Is "stark staring"+"ajd." an English construction?

    5:

    "That was nice. I got a big bang out of that."

    To get a bang out of something, does it mean that you found something interesting? Amusing?

    "I hate the movies like poison, but I get a bang imitating them."

    Here it seems to imply he has a lot of fun imitating movies.

    And yet here:

    "You could tell old Spencer'd got a big bang out of buying it. That's what I mean. You take somebody old as hell, like old Spencer, and they can get a big bang out of buying a blanket."

    I can't imagine a "funny" connotation here. It seems to me that, here, the expression means to find something interesting and/or amusing. But I'm not sure whether it always means both or whether it has a different meaning depending on the context.

    6.

    acquainted:

    " I was personally acquainted with at least two girls he gave the time to."

    I thought acquainted meant:

    "To cause to come to know personally: Let me acquaint you with my family."

    Shouldn't we say:

    I personally acquainted at least two girls he gave the time to.

    Unless in the sentence above it means someone else introduced the girls to him and that's how he got to know them.

    So acquainting someone is, say, knowing someone on a deeper level than just meeting them, right?
    Last edited by Noego; 04-May-2008 at 05:58.

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    #2

    Re: Some vocab questions

    gladstone-a small traveller's bag

  2. Noego's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Some vocab questions

    gladstone-a small traveller's bag
    ah AH!

    Thank you!

    EDIT: Another one:

    "One of those stories with a lot of phony, lean-jawed guys named David in it, and a lot of phony girls named Linda or Marcia that are always
    lighting all the goddam Davids' pipes for them."

    What is the meaning of lean-jawed, is there some other meaning or does it mean "straigth jawed" although I would be hard-pressed to explain what lean-jawed means...

    Some clarifications would really help.

    EDIT2: Sorry, another one (I had a lot of questions in store which were bothering me)

    "Yes, it is," I said. She was right. I did have a goddam Pencey sticker on one of my Gladstones. Very corny, I'll admit.

    Now about corny.

    It means clichť, something that stops being interesting because it's used too much.

    Could we say that corny means something that really lacks originality? Would that be appropriate?

    EDIT3:

    "Ernest? Sure," I said. Then I watched her take off her gloves. Boy, was she lousy with rocks.

    What does "lousy with rocks" mean?

    EDIT4:

    "I know he does," I said. Then I started shooting the old crap around a little bit. "He adapts himself very well to things. He really does. I mean he really knows how to adapt himself."

    Does shooting the crap only means have a conversation with someone or does it mean to have a conversation with someone in order to amuse oneself?
    Last edited by Noego; 04-May-2008 at 06:30.

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    #4

    Re: Some vocab questions

    I presume that the writer thinks that bony jaws are unpleasant.
    If something's corny, it lacks originalityt to such a degree that it makes us squirm a bit.
    She had a lot of diamonds on her fingers.
    Yes- chatting idly.

  3. Noego's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Some vocab questions

    Thank you!

    How about those words, could anyone help me out please?

    1:

    ''It wasn't too far, but it was cold as hell, and the snow made it hard for walking, and my Gladstones kept banging hell out of my legs.''

    What are ''gladstones'' exactly? Are they some kind of winter boots?

    2: "I have this grandmother that's quite lavish with her dough."

    According to my dictionary:

    Immoderate in giving or bestowing; unstinting

    Is lavish another way of describing someone who is very generous?

    Is it pejorative, as in saying, someone who gives too much for their own good?

    3.

    "It's a long story. I don't wanna bore ya, Ackley. I'm thinking of your welfare."

    When you talk about the welfare of someone, does it emcompass both their mental and physical well-being?

    Or does it emphasize more than the other?

    Or is it more related to the context; it sometimes means your physical integrity and sometimes your happiness?

    4:

    "It just drove me stark staring mad when I thought about her and Stradlater parked somewhere in that fat-assed Ed Banky's car."

    What is the meaning of stark here?

    From my understanding, it means completely.

    In this sentence, it means it made Holden extremely angry, furious.

    Is "stark staring"+"ajd." an English construction?

    5:

    "That was nice. I got a big bang out of that."

    To get a bang out of something, does it mean that you found something interesting? Amusing?

    "I hate the movies like poison, but I get a bang imitating them."

    Here it seems to imply he has a lot of fun imitating movies.

    And yet here:

    "You could tell old Spencer'd got a big bang out of buying it. That's what I mean. You take somebody old as hell, like old Spencer, and they can get a big bang out of buying a blanket."

    I can't imagine a "funny" connotation here. It seems to me that, here, the expression means to find something interesting and/or amusing. But I'm not sure whether it always means both or whether it has a different meaning depending on the context.

    6.

    acquainted:

    " I was personally acquainted with at least two girls he gave the time to."

    I thought acquainted meant:

    "To cause to come to know personally: Let me acquaint you with my family."

    Shouldn't we say:

    I personally acquainted at least two girls he gave the time to.

    Unless in the sentence above it means someone else introduced the girls to him and that's how he got to know them.

    So acquainting someone is, say, knowing someone on a deeper level than just meeting them, right?

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