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    #1

    "elope" is used for...

    I checked my electronic dictionary, it says "elope (to run away from one's husband with a lover)" is alluded to female. But in Oxford dictionary, it doesn't mention which gender this word is alluded to.

    So if my electronic dictionary is right, is there any words opposite "elope" (to run away from one's wife with a lover) ?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "elope" is used for...

    Quote Originally Posted by Assassin View Post
    I checked my electronic dictionary, it says "elope (to run away from one's husband with a lover)" is alluded to female. But in Oxford dictionary, it doesn't mention which gender this word is alluded to.

    So if my electronic dictionary is right, is there any words opposite "elope" (to run away from one's wife with a lover) ?
    Hi assassin, "elope" is used for both a man or a woman, or indeed a couple and it doesn't neccessarily mean to run away from ones spouse. At one time in the UK, young couples who wanted to marry without their parents consent "eloped", often to Gretna Green, a small town just over the Scottish border, where they could marry without parental consent.

  2. shalstudent's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "elope" is used for...

    ((Not a teacher))

    As far as I am aware, "elope" is a term which means:
    a) to run away secretly to be married, usually without the consent or knowledge of one's parents.

    b) To run away with a lover.

    c) to escape.

    It does not signify the gender.

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    #4

    Re: "elope" is used for...

    Elope=(women) runaway from husband or home . ( with lover ) . Source-Oxford Dictionary.
    Last edited by rj1948; 05-May-2008 at 09:10.

  3. shalstudent's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "elope" is used for...

    Please check out this link.

    Elopement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "elope" is used for...

    Quote Originally Posted by rj1948 View Post
    Elope=(women) runaway from husband or home . ( with lover ) . Source-Oxford Dictionary.
    This gender-bias is a historical accident. It used to be that men 'sowed their wild oats' (which was "normal and only to be expected" - as Molière put it in Le Tartuffe 'Un homme est... un homme qui... un homme enfin'). If a young man ran off with a girl without the permission of her parents, it was reprehensible but it was 'the way of the world'. This sort of double-standard affected the etymology and meaning of a lot of words: two examples - at one time a man couldn't suffer from hysteria because he didn't have a womb (Gk hysteros), and there is no female equivalent of 'uxorious' (=over-devoted to one's wife) because a woman was supposed to be devoted (and unquestioningly obedient) to her husband, drunk or sober.

    Usage and meanings can be implicitly sexist, and dictionaries can be too.

    b

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