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  1. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Some grammar books (in my country) say:
    Eating a banana every day is good for health.
    To eat a banana every day is good for health.
    They are the same.
    According to your explanation, the eating of a banana every day is good for health.
    Which one do you, a native speaker, use?
    Thank you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Eating a banana every day is good for (your) health. This one.

  3. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    I appreciate your answer.
    "Eating a banana every day" is a gerund noun.
    Thank you.

  4. Roselin's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Nobody answered my question. This isn't fair.


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    #15

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    Nobody answered my question. This isn't fair.
    Yes, it isn't fair.


    "Grammatical" words like to /that/who etc can be labelled differently depending on how you use them in sentences.

    For instance "who" can be an interrogative pronoun (as in Who ate the chocolate cake?); or it can be a relative pronoun (as in The boy who ate the chocolate cake is a greedy little boy.)

    "To" has two different labels. You have the "to-infinitive" (as in I want to have some chocolate cake.) And then you have the "to" that's a preposition [as in I'm going to the party (where the party is a noun phrase) OR I look forward to hearing from you (where hearing is the gerund and, in fact, what follows hearing is considered to be part of the gerund.

    As was suggested higher up, a gerund is treated like a noun. That's why it can be preceded by a preposition.


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    #16

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I look forward to playing(noun) games.
    I look forward to seeing(noun) you.

    These are not nouns they are the present participle forms of the verbs. The nouns are 'games' and 'you'.
    Sorry to disagree! In fact, they are not present participles, they are gerunds!

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Oh yes? Please explain.

  6. Roselin's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    Yes, it isn't fair.


    "Grammatical" words like to /that/who etc can be labelled differently depending on how you use them in sentences.

    For instance "who" can be an interrogative pronoun (as in Who ate the chocolate cake?); or it can be a relative pronoun (as in The boy who ate the chocolate cake is a greedy little boy.)

    "To" has two different labels. You have the "to-infinitive" (as in I want to have some chocolate cake.) And then you have the "to" that's a preposition [as in I'm going to the party (where the party is a noun phrase) OR I look forward to hearing from you (where hearing is the gerund and, in fact, what follows hearing is considered to be part of the gerund.

    As was suggested higher up, a gerund is treated like a noun. That's why it can be preceded by a preposition.
    Thanks for clearing the doubts!

  7. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #19

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    I have doubts too regarding this.

    1) I want TO SEE you.

    2) She wants TO SMILE.

    If we have to use first of the verb with TO then why are you using first form of the verb + ing with to in " looking forward to seeing" ?
    "To see you" is the infinite. The infinite is used to qualify a verb, particularly to express purpose. Therefore "to see you", the infinite qualifies the verb "want", expressing the purpose.
    look(verb)+forward(adverb)+to(preposition)= phrasal verb
    Gerund "seeing you" is used after the preposition.
    Therefore, I am looking forward to seeing you.(not to see you)
    Hope that help you.
    Have a good time!

  8. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #20

    Re: I'm looking forward to see(ing) you.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I look forward to playing(noun) games.
    I look forward to seeing(noun) you.

    These are not nouns they are the present participle forms of the verbs. The nouns are 'games' and 'you'.
    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    Sorry to disagree! In fact, they are not present participles, they are gerunds!
    I think so.
    Participles are the parts of the verb. Here, they are not parts of the verb. Therefore they are gerund.

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