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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    2 Proverbs

    AFTER he became notorious as the man who urged God to damn America, Jeremiah Wright claims he wrestled with two impulses. The first was to heed the proverb: “It is better to be quiet and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.” The second was to “come across the room” and fight back. Mr Wright's decision to come across the room with his mouth wide open is proving a disaster for all concerned.
    Hi! The paragraph above is an excerpt from The Economist. And Here are my questions.

    Q1: What does " come across the room" mean?

    Q2: What does it mean for " It is better to be quiet and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"?

    I fished a key out of the Internet about it. Is the interpretation as below in blue appropriate?

    It means if you don't say anything people may think you're an idiot. But if you speak and you don't really know what you're talking about or have no real insight into the subject then they'll KNOW you're an idiot.

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 06-May-2008 at 11:43. Reason: syntax error


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: 2 Proverbs

    Your understanding of question 2 is correct - exactly so!.

    As for (1), I think perhaps you mean the phrase "come across". This has a meaning common to Brit. Eng. and Am.:
    come across : to meet or find by chance
    "I came across these old photos recently."

    I'll leave the other two meanings to an American!!!
    Last edited by David L.; 06-May-2008 at 12:31.

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 2 Proverbs

    Hi David L.

    Thanks for your answer. As to my first question, I refer to the whole phrase " come across room" since there's a double quotation mark in the original context. I understood what " come across" means.


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    #4

    Re: 2 Proverbs

    You would need to quote the passage. As it stands, 'come across room' doesn't have a meaning. The closest would be, say, a director talking to actors, and saying:
    "When you enter, I want you to come across the room, pause, then go over to the window and look out."

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