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      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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    #1

    some apple

    a. Have some apple / Have an apple.
    b. Have some potato / Have a potato.

    These two sentences come from the CAE. I'd like to know what 'some apple' means --'a certain apple' or 'some stuff of an apple'?

    Thank you in advance.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: some apple

    Have a helping of apple/have an unspecified amount of something. It is what would be said by a hostess to a guest to whom she is serving food.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: some apple

    Anglika's suggestion is the most common. There is another, also to do with the serving of food. If someone has an apple in one hand and a knife in the other 'Have some apple' would be an offer to cut it in half and share it. (If someone was actually eating an apple and offering an amount of it, the same words would be possible; but the eater would be more likely to say 'Do you want some?' [proffering the apple, so not specifying it] or - informally - 'Do you want a bite/chunk?.

    In the case of the potato, this interpretation is much less likely (though possible, if the speaker were having a packed lunch). 'Have some potato' would almost always refer, as Anglika said, to a serving (in this case, of mashed potatoes - as otherwise the speaker would say 'Have some potatoes').

    b

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