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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    which one

    hi,
    Does this sentence sound right to your ears
    'It has to be neat and exempt from all drilling botches'?

    thanks.

  2. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: which one

    Hi, as a Brit and mentor, but not a teacher, I would suggest:

    'It has to be neat and free from all drilling botches'?

    Note the OED definition of exempt, which would not fit the context:

    AskOxford: exempt
    adjective free from an obligation or liability imposed on others.

    Hope this helps
    NT

    PS I'm aware of the verb, "to botch up a job", but not used to seeing it as a noun.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: which one

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    hi,
    Does this sentence sound right to your ears
    'It has to be neat and free from all drilling botches'?
    What is a drilling botch? What does that sentence refer to?

    ~R

  4. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which one

    Hi RonBee

    I assume the sentence refers to a block of wood or steel etc that is to be used for decorative purposes after drilling it. If it contained any badly drilled holes, or holes drilled in the wrong position, it wouldn't look attractive and therefore would have to be discarded.

    AskOxford: botch
    noun (also botch-up) a badly performed action or task.

    Hope this clarifies it - I had to look it up.
    Rgds
    NT

  5. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: which one

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    Hi RonBee

    I assume the sentence refers to a block of wood or steel etc that is to be used for decorative purposes after drilling it. If it contained any badly drilled holes, or holes drilled in the wrong position, it wouldn't look attractive and therefore would have to be discarded.

    AskOxford: botch
    noun (also botch-up) a badly performed action or task.

    Hope this clarifies it - I had to look it up.
    Rgds
    NT
    Thanks!

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