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  1. new2grammar's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Punjabi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 880
    #1

    Kindly explain this

    1. The students who passed entrance examination applied for medicine

    2. The students, who passed entrance examination, applied for medicine

    The 1st sentence without coma means not all students passed and the 2nd sentence means all students passed the exam. Kindly anyone explain me more about this rule or give me references so I can learn in detail

  2. #2

    Smile Re: Kindly explain this

    I am looking for some references, but for now if you were to take away the phrase in parantheses (between the commas), you might find it more easy to understand why the second phrase has this meaning. In the first example, the commas create an empahsis that you don't find in the second.

    However, it is certainly not the best way of writing the sentences to portray their finer meanings because as we can see it does lead to a certain amount of ambiguity.

    My preferred sentences in relation to the meanings would be:

    1) Those students who passed the entrance examination applied for medicine.

    And

    2) The students passed the entrance examination and applied for medicine.

    If I find a reference, I'll send you a message.

    SB


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    #3

    Re: Kindly explain this

    Quote Originally Posted by new2grammar View Post
    1. The students who passed the entrance examination applied for medicine

    2. The students, who passed the entrance examination, applied for medicine

    The 1st sentence without commas means not all the students passed and the 2nd sentence means all the students passed the exam. Kindly anyone explain me more about this rule or give me references so I can learn in detail
    Your analysis is correct. The clauses beginning with "who" are both relative clauses.

    In sentence n 1, you have a defining (also called "restrictive") relative clause.

    In sentence n 2 you have a non-defining (also called non-restrictive) relative clause.

    To know more about them you could click on this in the grammar section: Search Results for 'relative clauses' - UsingEnglish.com

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